Jump to content


Photo

Spurs?


13 replies to this topic

#1 Century Oak

Century Oak

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 508 posts
  • Location:Alabama

Posted 07 July 2010 - 01:39 AM

Ok this is not meant to be a discussion on whether spurs are necessary or not, IMO they are for some horses and many others I don't use spurs with at all. I rode Prince for ages with a spur only on my right heel! However, I have one little monkey that needs them because he tends to get studdy and pushy against my leg and frankly I'd rather an "ask" then a "tell" if needed and avoid 5 minutes of asking and being ignored (much like with my teenagers now!) :th_thparty0036:

In any case, I have been looking at spurs and of course I am led first off to some long neck blunt dressage spurs... but... the more I look and think about it the more I wonder if some blunt rowel dressage spurs wouldn't be more humane. It makes me wonder if the roller action of the rowel wouldn't actually be easier because it does move than the blunt stabby motion of the blunt spurs?

Again, this isn't meant to be a discussion on the evils of spurs, like any other tool they are just that .. a tool and nothing more. I'm tall and my horse is short, I need something to help me reach his sides with my heels without distorting my leg position so in this instance a long neck spur is warranted.. however I am wondering if the blunt rowel spurs wouldn't be nicer to use than the plain blunt ones. The ones that are really interesting are the ones called "humane" spurs that just are a burr on the inside of the heel. Thoughts or suggestions?
Mental Meanderings Of A Barn Goddess

Guardian still to: Zandai Jasoor (Zandai Ibn Omar x Glorieta Saqlima) & Impress Rissala (Imtaarif x Zandai Om Roda)

Donna Sabatine
Kryo Kinetics USA Licensed Technician

Now serving Southeastern USA as well as South Central USA

#2 Cheryl L

Cheryl L

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,105 posts
  • Location:Michigan, USA
  • Interests:Arabians
    Gardening
    Poodles
    and a touch of photography

Posted 07 July 2010 - 01:48 AM

I like the round end dressage spurs, which I think is the long neck that you are talking about. I have very short legs and I like to have the added "touch" of a round/blunt spur. The woman that was finishing my horse under saddle, used the same thing. I really don't like the rowels, because they do move. I have seen riders using them and they tend to be a bit more slippery. The tend to roll and move more.

#3 Century Oak

Century Oak

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 508 posts
  • Location:Alabama

Posted 07 July 2010 - 01:51 AM

I wondered about that, have you seen the ones with the neoprene or whatever on the heel part to stop the movement?
Mental Meanderings Of A Barn Goddess

Guardian still to: Zandai Jasoor (Zandai Ibn Omar x Glorieta Saqlima) & Impress Rissala (Imtaarif x Zandai Om Roda)

Donna Sabatine
Kryo Kinetics USA Licensed Technician

Now serving Southeastern USA as well as South Central USA

#4 Cheryl L

Cheryl L

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,105 posts
  • Location:Michigan, USA
  • Interests:Arabians
    Gardening
    Poodles
    and a touch of photography

Posted 07 July 2010 - 02:03 AM

No, I haven't. It would be just another thing to break down at the most inopportune moment.

#5 Century Oak

Century Oak

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 508 posts
  • Location:Alabama

Posted 07 July 2010 - 02:24 AM

haha :th_thparty0036: No it's not part of the spur. Think of it as a wrap around the spur to give it some grip on the boots.

I have the long neck blunties, I'll give those a try and see how they work, he is used to the rowels so we'll see :bigemo_harabe_net-123:
Mental Meanderings Of A Barn Goddess

Guardian still to: Zandai Jasoor (Zandai Ibn Omar x Glorieta Saqlima) & Impress Rissala (Imtaarif x Zandai Om Roda)

Donna Sabatine
Kryo Kinetics USA Licensed Technician

Now serving Southeastern USA as well as South Central USA

#6 VanAlma

VanAlma

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,602 posts

Posted 07 July 2010 - 11:50 AM

In any case, I have been looking at spurs and of course I am led first off to some long neck blunt dressage spurs... but... the more I look and think about it the more I wonder if some blunt rowel dressage spurs wouldn't be more humane. It makes me wonder if the roller action of the rowel wouldn't actually be easier because it does move than the blunt stabby motion of the blunt spurs?

... Thoughts or suggestions?

I don't ride with spurs, but from what I have witnessed, any spur is only as humane as the person using them. They can be a spectacular aid and a horrific abuse.
Having said that, the rowels can be walked up their side in an increasing pressure, which I have seen done expertly, and seem like what you are looking for.

Van Alma Arabians
Find us on Facebook!


#7 Century Oak

Century Oak

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 508 posts
  • Location:Alabama

Posted 07 July 2010 - 01:38 PM

Exactly Kate, and I've seen people make a horses mouth bleed with an egg butt snaffle :( It's amazing how some riders can take things so innocuous (boy did I butcher the spelling on that one!) and make them into a weapon.

the rowels can be walked up their side in an increasing pressure, which I have seen done expertly, and seem like what you are looking for.


That's what I'm thinking. I mean, if you take the blunt spurs and drag them along your thigh with some pressure, I'd think that would be more biting than a rowel walking up the side. Saying that the round blunt ones like I have wouldn't be bad. The only time I can see the blunts being rough - but I guess the rowels would be too - is if you sunk them into the sides of the horse - which btw is NOT the correct way to use spurs! I haven't needed spurs in a long time with the horses I have, but will with Jasoor mainly due to the length of my leg and being able to reach his sides for cues correctly. I'll try the blunties and see how he likes those and if not, then I'll go with the rowels which is what he's used to.

Fwiw, the rowels I'm talking about roll but are pretty blunted on the edges, I am not talking about those big old pointy star spurs :)
Mental Meanderings Of A Barn Goddess

Guardian still to: Zandai Jasoor (Zandai Ibn Omar x Glorieta Saqlima) & Impress Rissala (Imtaarif x Zandai Om Roda)

Donna Sabatine
Kryo Kinetics USA Licensed Technician

Now serving Southeastern USA as well as South Central USA

#8 VanAlma

VanAlma

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,602 posts

Posted 08 July 2010 - 12:55 PM

Fwiw, the rowels I'm talking about roll but are pretty blunted on the edges, I am not talking about those big old pointy star spurs :2_horses:

Well, if you ever DO decide to use the pointy ones, please make sure to have it videotaped so that we can learn from ya :)

Van Alma Arabians
Find us on Facebook!


#9 Century Oak

Century Oak

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 508 posts
  • Location:Alabama

Posted 08 July 2010 - 12:58 PM

hehe no worries!! :2_horses:
Mental Meanderings Of A Barn Goddess

Guardian still to: Zandai Jasoor (Zandai Ibn Omar x Glorieta Saqlima) & Impress Rissala (Imtaarif x Zandai Om Roda)

Donna Sabatine
Kryo Kinetics USA Licensed Technician

Now serving Southeastern USA as well as South Central USA

#10 Marilee

Marilee

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 566 posts
  • Location:Las Vegas, Nevada
  • Interests:Egyptian & Fadjur bloodlines, pedigree research, dressage, trail riding, Horse Council, 4-H, horses in education, halter and performance

Posted 10 July 2010 - 12:12 AM

I was going to answer a few days ago, but I thought of a bettter answer today. We never used spurs on any of our horses--Arabian or not. When we/I first started taking lessons from a dressage mentor in the late 70s, we learned that the horse ws not listening to our cues or we were not sending the cues correctly. Increasing the size of the cue was just that; you want the result from a subtle cue, not an obvious one, whether you are riding English or Western. We were shown to ride with a dressage whip alongside our leg, one in each hand, quietly and then tap tap the horse when a leg cue was given. When the horse listens to that and then only needs a leg/heel cue, then later the whip (only a training aid here to reinforce an- unlistened- to leg cue) is not needed much. I know because my horse was very strong on one side and weak on the other, from doing barrels, so as I did more dressage work with him, and supple--ed him up and then softened his "hard side" and built up his weaker side, then he became balanced, much softer in the bit, and longer when needed or more engaged when needed. So my thought for the day is to use something else than spurs, as above described, or do some ground work ( ala Parelli) where your horse learns to yield to a cue on the side of the body, rather than just spurs. He needs a reward or softening too, from yielding to pressure, rather than just more pressure. This is hard to explain, but I've tried.

#11 Century Oak

Century Oak

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 508 posts
  • Location:Alabama

Posted 10 July 2010 - 01:47 AM

I understand you completely and I do ride with a dressage whip as well :bigemo_harabe_net-109: He's getting really good at moving just off of leg pressure, but he's still green and has his moments. I strongly believe in asking softly and giving them a chance to listen first, then follow it up with more if needed.. in this case what would be a heel tap becomes an issue without a spur to help me reach his side. I'm 5'8"... he's 14.1 and even though he's got good size and body, if I needed to use more than just my calf cues I have to twist my foot to get in a position to be able to use my heel on him at all. With the spurs it gives me contact when I need it.

My whip I use when needed but imagine there will be one side it will be more useful on than the other. I've had one of those soft/hard sided guys too.. he was the one I wore one spur with but you could -not- carry a crop with him. I trained him and other than a couple months with a trainer who did not carry one, I have no idea where his aversion for it came from. It was like he really resented it and would let you know it on no uncertain terms :laughing1:
Mental Meanderings Of A Barn Goddess

Guardian still to: Zandai Jasoor (Zandai Ibn Omar x Glorieta Saqlima) & Impress Rissala (Imtaarif x Zandai Om Roda)

Donna Sabatine
Kryo Kinetics USA Licensed Technician

Now serving Southeastern USA as well as South Central USA

#12 larapintavian

larapintavian

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 413 posts
  • Location:SW of OKC
  • Interests:Classical music, Arabians ... SEs in particular ... sporting type, Saluki Hounds, Cockatoos.

Posted 10 July 2010 - 04:19 AM

Chris uses only the blunt end spurs ... mainly because that is the only kind allowed in Eventing, rowels are illegal in all phases.

Chris, too, is tall and with her most advanced purebred Eventer she actually had to ride with her stirrups a bit short in Dressage to properly cue him. He would not tolerate spurs, and when he reached Intermediate Level (5th of the 6 Eventing levels .... the one where riders start wearing the shadbelly coat) where spurs are required in the dressage phase, Chris was almost panicky. She ended up wearing the very smallest, shortest spur she could find, and let those stirrups down ... but, that was one particular horse. She's had others she needed spurs on even at the lower levels.

Each horse is so very different.
Sharon Jackson
Emphasis on Arab Eventers
http://www.larapintasporthorses.com

#13 1rider

1rider

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 255 posts
  • Location:greenwood,ca

Posted 08 July 2011 - 04:17 AM

A good little helper is the Le Spur. They sell them at Dover and Stateline. They give a little more than just the heal of my rubber shoes.



#14 hansi

hansi

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 5,786 posts
  • Location:Hawthorne,fl,USA
  • Interests:straight egyptian arabian horse breeder since 1967.
    researcher, author of 24 book puplications on arabian horses, the straight egyptian index and others,
    quarantine staton and manager okayed by florida depeartment of agriculture.

Posted 30 June 2012 - 07:24 PM


Hi Ken

I always use spurs,- blunt spurs- especially when starting a young horse. Spurs are like whips, meaning they can be an "Aid" or a punishment.
We women dont have the strong calf muscles as men do, some cant even squeeze a fly to death with it, like me.

We have an old saying in Germany" the horse should always think God is on his back and the devil on his sides."

To use spurs propery, one needs to do exercise with the ankels, so that one can use the spurs for whatever needed and when. this also means one must have a good seat and sit INT THE HORSE, not just on top.With a "stiff" foot one cant control the fine nuances needed. Therefore, exercise those feet, rolling from left to right and via versa.

Hansi
Hansi-Heck Melnyk
Serenity Arabian farms, Florida, USA



Posted Image




Reply to this topic



  


0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users