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#41 Rosi Straub

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Posted 25 April 2009 - 12:15 PM

Posting Oli Apr 21 2009, 06:47 PM: Auf Bild 4, die Braune, daß ist doch die kleine Gharib?
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#42 oli

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Posted 25 April 2009 - 01:32 PM

Ja, das ist Nurina (Ikhnaton x Nureddina v. Gharib). Nureddina´s diesjähriges Fohlen von DF Malik Jamil ist leider nach einem halben Tag gestorben (war 5 Wochen zu früh).
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#43 Rosi Straub

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Posted 25 April 2009 - 02:06 PM

... das ist ja so tragisch, daß tut mir so leid! Ich wollte mir genau dieses Fohlen unbedingt ansehen ...
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#44 ponygirl

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Posted 25 April 2009 - 06:33 PM

Thank you for sharing all your wonderful photo's I have enjoyed reviewing them all.
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#45 oli

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Posted 28 April 2009 - 08:05 PM

A History of Weil-Marbach
by Betty Finke
Arabian Horse World magazine
March 1984 issue



The Marbach Central and State Stud of Baden-Wurttemburg, founded in 1563, is the oldest of the German State Studs. It was founded by the Dukes of Wurttemberg, who raised warmblood horses of primarily Trakehner and Arab blood. In 1932, the Marbach Stud inherited the entire purebred Arabian herd from one of the most important stud farms on the continent, the Private Royal Stud Weil. The present-day Arabian herd at marbach represents the oldest purebred mare family in Europe.

Today, Marbach owns over 350 horses representing a variety of breeds. Young horses of all breeds are pastured together, and it is interesting to note that the Arabian horses always assume herd leadership.
Visitors from all over the world come to Marbach to see the historic buildings, beautiful grounds, stallion parades, and of course, the "Silver herd" of Marbach Arabians that have had a profound influence on Arabian breeding throughout the world.

I. WEIL: 1817-1932

The history of Weil-Marbach, and with it the history of Arabian horse breeding in Germany, began in the kingdom of Wurttemberg in 1817, when Crown Prince Wilhelm---later King Wilhelm I---founded a royal stud at Weil with the express purpose of breeding purebred Arabians. This was a novelty at the time; while Arabians were popular as mounts for aristocracy and the cavalry, and were used in most light horse breeding programs, they were hardly ever bred pure. Most stud farms used Arabian stallions on local mares, a method that produced a variety of modern light horse breeds, including the Shagya Arabian of eastern Europe.

From that start, however, Prince Wilhelm based his own breeding program on mares imported from the desert of Arabia. One of these became the foundation of the stud and is the only foundation mare of Weil still found in pedigrees today: the mare Murana I, born 1808 and imported to Germany in 1816 by Baron von Fechtig.

In 1817, Baron von Fechtig imported the stallionsBairactar and Tajar, and seven mares. Of these, only Bairactar was to have a lasting impact. Just as Murana I was the foundation mare, Bairactar was the foundation sire. In fact, every horse that traces to Murana I also has multiple crosses to Bairactar---for example, Khemosabi has eight lines to Murana and 47 to Bairactar. Unfortunately, no portraits have survived of Murana, but Bairactar is portrayed as a white stallion of superior type and quality. Apparently his head wasn't dished, but it was extremely refined, with huge eyes.

The next significant importation arrived in 1819 through the efforts of the Polish Count Rzewuski. It consisted of 12 mares and eight stallions. One of thses stallions was of lasting importance. This was the stallion Goumousch-Bournou. He contributed size and bone without sacrificing the purity of blood or type.
The last significant desertbred additions to the stud under Wilhelm I were the two mares Hamdany I and Czebessie I, who were both acquired from Babolna in 1821. Neither of them founded a family that survived, but Hamdany I brought with her a filly by Siglavy DB (the same Siglavy who founded a Shagya and a Lippizaner sire line). This filly, Sady III, was the dam of Bairactar's best son and Weil's best-known product, Amurath 1829. Amurath was chief sire at Weil from 1836 to 1856. His classic beauty and correct conformation were captured for posterity by several artists of his time. He is still an inspiration for many breeders today. Neither of the other stallions used in Wilhelm I's time---Zarif DB or Gadir---had quite the same impact.

In modern pedigrees, Arabians tracing to Weil-bred horses read like a who's who of the Arabian industry. A few of the US National Champions that trace to all the above foundation stock are: Khemosabi, *Bask, *Aladdinn, *Marsianin, Gai Parada, Amurath Bandolero, *Elkin, *Elkana and *Aramus.
Most of these modern horses trace to Weil through one particular stallion, Amurath 1881, also known as Amurath "Weil" because of his influence. His pedigree was a combination of all the foundation animals of Weil, with several crosses to Bairactar. Unfortuantely, Wilhelm's successor, Karl, who came to the throne and took over the stud in 1864, did not share his father's passion for Arabians. As a result, Amurath 1881 was sold to the Austrain military stud at Radutz, and the Bairactar sire line at Weil was lost. Unfortunate as this was for Weil, it proved to be good for Amurath 1881. He sired 315 foals at Radutz, which spread his bloodlines all over Europe. Two of his get are enough to illustrate his influence. His daughter, 238 Amurath, was the dam of of the famous Polish mare Koalicja, whose foals include the dam of *Witez II, Federacja, and the two great sires Enwer Bey and Miecznik---the latter an ancestor of Khemosabi, *Aladdinn, and *Elkin, among others. Amurath 1881's son Amurath II also went to Poland and sired Amurath Sahib, the maternal grandsire of *Bask and *Aramus as well as the sire of Arax, a fundamental horse in Russian Arabian pedigrees. Amurath Sahib, through his sons Arax and Gwarny, is the only source of the Bairactar sire line today.

One stallion was added to the program under King Karl, Djerid DB, who was imported from Egypt. His photograph shows a horse with good basic conformation, but a very coarse head and neck. He was used from 1876 to 1890 and sired two important mares, Saida and Saoud, full sisters who were instrumental in carrying on the Murana I dam line. If Djerid really was as coarse as he looks, the coarseness probably got lost in the heavy inbreeding to the refined Bairactar.

In 1891, Wilhelm II took over the throne of Wurttemberg and the Weil Stud. He, too, was more interested in Thoroughbreds than in Arabians, and by the turn of the century, the Arabian broodmare band had shrunk to ten mares. The new management distrusted the principle of inbreeding and relied more heavily on outcross stallions. Foremost among the new sires introduced in this time were Souakim DB and Dardziling (Mazepa X Omega) from the Slawuta Stud---the first Arabian imported to Germany from Poland. Apparently, no pictures exist of thses two horses, but both of them proved to be excellent broodmare sires. Souakim's claims to fame are his son Dynamit, out of a Djerid daughter, and his daughters Soldateska and Sardine, both out of Amurath 1881 mares. Soldateska was the dam of the famous Jatta and of Landsknecht, who was exported to Poland and sired *Azja IV, the dam of Azraff. Dardziling's daughters of significance were both out of the Souakim daughter Sardine: Doris and Carmen. They became the progenitors of one of the two branches of the Murana I dam line, the other branch being that of Soldateska Jatta.

In 1921, the history of Weil entered its last stage under Wilhelm II's daughter, Princess Pauline zu Wied. At this time, though it had suffered from the war, Weil had good broodmares, but no sire. To remedy the situation, the Princess traded a homebred stallion for Babolna's aged Koheilan IV. Koheilan IV had already founded a sire line in Poland, which includes *Lotnik and *Pietuszok. Though old when he came to Weil, Koheilan IV gave the stud some valueable foals, above all the mare Caesarea and the already-mentioned stallion Landsknecht. The Princess, however, dreamed of reviving the tradition of Weil and importing a stallion from an Arabian country. Through the help of Carl Raswan, the dream became a reality in 1930 with the arrival of Jasir (Mabrouk X Negma) from the stud farm of Mohamed Ali in Egypt. Although Jasir was a full brother to the famous Mahroussa and was highly praised in his day, his pictures show a rather stocky and thick necked, though handsome, horse. As a sire, however, he more than merited the faith that was set in him. It was Jasir, through his daughters, who became the foundation of the Marbach Stud of today.

II. MARBACH: 1932 AND AFTER

The Marbach Stud has existed since 1573 as a private stud of the Dukes of Wurttemberg, and it still concentrates today on the Wurttemberg horse, a light horse breed with a strong admixture of Trakehner and Arabian blood. The pure Arabian program began in 1932 with the arrival of the Weil stock. There were three stallions, including Jasir, and ten mares: daughters of Souakim, Koheilan IV, Dardziling and Dynamit, four of them with foals by Jasir at side. All of them, except of course Jasir, were of the Murana I family.

The relocated herd faced serious problems from the start, the least of which was the much rougher climate of the Swabian Alb. Some of the mares were already old and died not long afterwards, and several others were relocated yet again in 1935, this time to Trakehnen, so that their blood survives today only in the Trakehner breed. In the end, the herd survived through only three mares: Soldateska (Souakim X Sylphide), Caesarea (Koheilan IV X Carmen), and Dinarsad (Dynamit X Doris), and their daughters by Jaisr, who remained herd sire at Marbach until 1947. By then, however, the stock consisted almost entirely of Jasir sons and daughters, and for some reason the management at that time didn't consider inbreeding. One outside stallion, Ahmet, was brought in from Roblingen, one of the very early private stud farms. But Ahmet, who was by a desertbred sire out of a mare with Babolna bloodlines, turned out not to be purebred, and as a consequence his get had to be eliminated from the purebred program---an immense setback for the stud at a time when purebred stallions were very hard to come by. There were hardly any private Arabian breeders in Germany then, and for obvious reasons importation was impossible so shortly after the war. The situation was so desperate that a Shagya stallion was used (because of him and Ahmet, the Marbach Stud became the first breeder of Shagyas in Germany). Of course, none of the offspring of these stallions remained in the Arabian breeding program.
Finally, through the efforts of Ernst Bilke, a Jasir son was traded with another stud for Wind (Wyrwidab in PASB), one of the many east European horses that had been scattered by the war. Wind was by Ofir, the sire of the "Three W's," Witraz, Wielki Szlem, and *Witez II, out of Jaga II, who descended from Weil through 1881, so he was not entirely unrelated. Beroe he came to Marbach, he had been used in breeding East Friesian horses; his blood as well as that of the Jasir son who replaced him, Jason, is still found in the East Friesian breed today. At Marbach, Wind survived only three seasons and sired 12 foals, but three of his daughters became broodmares of great significance. His first foal, Winarsad (X Dinarsad), was champion mare at the very first Arabian show in Germany in 1967.

In 1949, the stud management was taken over by Dr. Georg Wenzler, who ran the stud until 1974 and was responsible for its renaissance. For many years, Dr. Wenzler's name was practically synonymous with Marbach, as was that of his most significant addition to the stud---Hadban Enzahi. In 1949, Hadban Enzahi was not yet foaled and Egypt was still out of reach. Wind's premature death in 1951 left another gap, but luckily it proved easier to fill than before. By now, there was at least one private Arabian stud in West Germany: The Achental Stud, owned by Gertraute Griesbach, who was responsible for rescuing many priceless Arabians from oblivion. Horses from Poland and from Babolna that had been evacuated during the war and placed with farmers or with circuses would have been lost had it not been for her efforts. One of these refugees was the stallion Halef (Towarzysz Pancerny in PASB), another Polish stallion who was descended from Amurath 1881 and the old Weil stock. He was by Enwer Bey, the sire of Trypolis, and out of *Kasztelanka, who was imported to the US by Henry Babson. Dr. Wenzler leased Halef for Marbach from 1951 to 1955, where he sired many great broodmares, all out of Jasir daughters. His best daughters were Haifa (X Jena), Halisa (X Isabella), Hamdi (X Jadine), and the famous three sisters out of Jatta---Haita, Hathor (the dam of *Sanacht), and Hajar. Among Halef's sons, the full brothers Haladin and Hadif (X Jadine) proved most significant, especially Haladin, who sired foals at Marbach and for several private breeders before going to Switzerland and getting the Arabian breed started there.
Neither Wind nor Halef, for all the quality they undoubtedly had, really conformed to the Weil-Marbach type. Both were primarily used because of their availability. Halef's typically Polish type never came through in his get, who had more of the old Egyptian look in them---reminiscent of horses like Mahroussa and *Nasr. Dr. Wenzler had intended from the start that the next sire should come from Egypt again, and after Halef's death in 1955, the trip to Egypt finally became a reality and ended with the purchase of the white colt Hadban Enzahi (Nazeer X Kamla) and the filly Nadja (Nazeer X Nefisa) from General Pettko-Szandtner at El Zahraa.

For the next 20 years, Hadban Enzahi was Marbach. He proved to be just the right sire for the Halef, Wind, and Jasir mares, further strengthening the Marbach type, which is still recognizable today. His get were exported throughout the world; Dahman and Ibn Hadsai went to Holland, Masan and Mabrouka to France, Habashi to Switzerland, Mubark to England, Shokry and Shams to Argentina, Mustafa, Damirah and Sindbad to Australia, and a few to the US---*Dalih, *Sanacht, *Dawamma, *Dawod, *Mameluck, *Dobry, *KEM Safir, *Maalak, *Saffa. Many of his sons and daughters were foundation stock for private breeding programs in Germany, to mention just a few of the better known ones: Darsi for Om el Arab, Diedje for Kauber Platte, Shari I and Demir for the Ismer Stud, Nabil for the Schwarzwald-Baar Stud, Seja for the Mundinger Stud, and grandson Salah for the Ostenfelde Stud. As for Marbach itself, of the 21 broodmares at the stud in 1983, 14 were Hadban Enzahi daughters; of seven stallions, one was his son and five were his grandsons. Only one stallion and four mares were not descended from him.

The filly imported along with Hadban, Nadja, founded another mare family at Marbach. There are six Nadja daughters in the broodmare band today, all straight Egyptian; Nadja herself, who was Reserve Champion Mare at the first international Arabian show in Germany in 1973, died in 1978.
During the 60's, several other bloodlines were added to the Marbach herd. Additional Egyptian blood came from the Lutetsburg Stud of Prince von Knyphausen, which was disbanded in 1965. As a result, the mares Malacha (El Sareei X Moheba), Masarrah (Haladin X Moheba), and Moheba II (Ghazal X Malacha) came to Marbach along with the stallion Ghazal (Nazeer X Bukra). Ghazal's main contribution, before his sale to a private breeder, was International Champion Saher, today one of the chief sires at Marbach. The mares returned to Lutetsburg in the 70's, but some of their produce remained, and the "M" family is a firmly established part of the Marbach herd. The other lines introduced in the 60's were Polish. Kanzler (Lowelas X Khamza) was used in the late '50's and early '60's, although his blood did not survive at Marbach, but did in some private programs. Karmin (Witraz X Canaria), a full brother to Celebes used around the same time, was luckier. Most of his get were sold (and bred on for their new owners), but his son Daikir was used as a sire and still has descendants in the broodmare band today.

Since 1970, however, all new additions have been Egyptian. In 1970, Dr. Wenzler purchased Gharib (Anter X Souhair) from Egypt, as a back-up for Hadban Enzahi. A true black, Gharib added some color to the Marbach herd---which was almost entirely white---as well as more length of neck and generally somewhat longer lines. He is also being used on Wurttemberg and Trakehner mares and has the rare distinction of having sired licensed stallions of three different breeds.

More recently, under the new management of Dr. Wolfgang Cranz, four other Egyptian stallions have been used. In the years 1976 and 1977, Mehanna (Galal X Mouna) stood at Marbach, and one of his colts was kept as a stallion. In 1981, Ansata Abbas Pasha was leased jointly by Dr. Hans Nagel, Marbach, and Babolna, and left two fillies and one colt that are being retained as breeding stock. Also, for the first time, mares have been sent to outside stallions: in 1981 to Dr. Nagel's American import Mohafez (*Ibn Moniet El Nefous X Ahroufa), and in 1982 to the Dobel Stud's Ibn Galal (Galal X Mogha). A new mare was added, JKB Hadbah (El Beshir X JKB Hamda), who also carries some Davenport blood through her sire. It is still too soon to judge the importance of these newer contributions; only time will tell.

Today, the Arabian herd at Marbach consists of seven stallions, 21 broodmares, 16 colts, and 11 fillies. It includes a small straight Egyptian program based on the families of Nadja and Malacha and the newer additions, but Marbach is by no means a straight Egyptian stud. Egyptian stallions were used at Weil and at Marbach long before anyone talked of "straight Egyptian,) and they were carefully chosen to complement and strengthen the old type, not to change it. Through the ups and downs of 166 years, through two world wars and more than one threat of extinction, the heritage of Wilhelm I of Wurttemberg has survived as an integral and unmistakable part of the Marbach herd, and of the world of Arabian horses today.
Oliver Seitz
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"A great pleasure in life is doing what people say you cannot do" (Walter Bagehot).

#46 Ray

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Posted 28 April 2009 - 10:07 PM

Great info, Oli - what a tremendous history! I would love to visit Marbach some day. :D

#47 oli

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Posted 30 May 2009 - 08:21 PM

Marbach Photos by Gabriele Boiselle slide show
Oliver Seitz
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#48 Jill C

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Posted 30 May 2009 - 09:08 PM

Thanks Oliver!

All of the photos and video are so inspirational :th_party0010: Absolutely Outstanding
Thank you so much.

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#49 GA Donatella

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Posted 31 May 2009 - 12:46 PM

Fantastic tour of Marbach ! I need a 'free' afternoon to go through all the videos :bigemo_harabe_net-123:

What a history and view of their lovely horses .. Thank you Oli for taking the time to share all this with us !

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#50 ponygirl

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Posted 31 May 2009 - 01:14 PM

Oli, thank you so much for the history, very enlightening!
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#51 oli

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Posted 08 June 2009 - 07:05 PM

Some photos of Marbach´s headsire DSCHEHIM (Pamir I x Dschihan by Nasrodin):

Dschehim Photos by Jan Reumann

and photos of Dschehim´s father PAMIR I (Penthagonn x Shams El Inaza), German WAHO-Trophy winner 2008

Pamir Photos by Jan Reumann

After following the links please click "Weiter" on the right (means next ;) )
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#52 oli

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Posted 28 June 2009 - 08:27 AM

Again some new videos


Souha:

Saouda

Shafali http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EWkR18PzfMk

Nuriye http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=16273XlSZNo
Oliver Seitz
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"A great pleasure in life is doing what people say you cannot do" (Walter Bagehot).

#53 Nikita

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Posted 28 June 2009 - 10:15 AM

Again some new videos

Souha (Nami x Sadana by Saher):

Saouda (Dschehim x Souda by Nami):


Nur zur Info: Beide Links führen zu derselben Youtube-Datei, nämlich der von Saouda (Dschehim x Souha).

Hier der korrekte Link für Souha: http://www.youtube.c...re=channel_page

#54 oli

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Posted 28 June 2009 - 01:35 PM

Nur zur Info: Beide Links führen zu derselben Youtube-Datei, nämlich der von Saouda (Dschehim x Souha).

Hier der korrekte Link für Souha: http://www.youtube.c...re=channel_page


Oh, danke - ich werde es oben korrigieren.
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#55 oli

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Posted 28 June 2009 - 07:01 PM

Nahdmi (Serenity Habib x Nasseb by Gharib)
Video
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#56 Ray

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Posted 28 June 2009 - 10:53 PM

Nahdmi (Serenity Habib x Nasseb by Gharib)
Video


Beautiful! Thanks Oli. It's great to be able to see another son of Serenity Habib.

#57 Katrin

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Posted 29 June 2009 - 05:54 AM

Pictures of Mahadin:

Attached File  picture_14.jpg   430.85KB   3 downloads

Attached File  picture_16.jpg   426.28KB   3 downloads

Attached File  picture_19.jpg   543.21KB   2 downloads

Attached File  picture_17.jpg   334.34KB   2 downloads

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#58 JacqueB

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Posted 29 June 2009 - 11:47 AM

Thank You so much Oli,
That was a 1984 article - have you had any conversations with people regarding the horses that Mohafez bred on? Like what did he contribute? or what did they value about his contribution? or disappointments?
or what he did as a sire, or what he could not do as a sire?
Or did you get to see him and his get and have your own assessment of him & his get?
Again thanks for taking the time to share.
JacqueB

#59 JacqueB

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Posted 29 June 2009 - 01:51 PM

Nahdmi (Serenity Habib x Nasseb by Gharib)
Video

Wow - HOW Cool was THAT!
Thanks Oli!
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#60 oli

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Posted 26 July 2009 - 11:06 AM

Video Dschehim

Video Pamir I

Video Said
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