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#1 Century Oak

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Posted 08 August 2010 - 02:17 PM

I think most of the people at least on this part of the forum, start and train their own horses. Doing such you have the times when you first climb on after appropriate groundwork, times when something new is learned and you can move to the next step etc. What I'd like to hear about are the times when you have a young horse - and by young I just mean green as some are older when they are started - that you have been working with to make an honest citizen of, then one day it just starts to "click" and you realize your student has now become your partner. I have a couple but would love to hear other stories too :68416045.wGDPMlLK.popcorn: This, to me, is the most rewarding part of riding. When you realize something is working and you are starting to grow together as a team :)
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#2 ponygirl

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Posted 09 August 2010 - 12:28 AM

I remember the black gelding I just sold when he realized when i pointed in a direction he was to go in that direction while lunging.
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#3 VanAlma

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Posted 14 August 2010 - 05:15 PM

Well, I've shared quite a few stories about Bubba and I, so I'm going to share one about Shiner, my 2.5 y/o stud colt.
I taught him to lunge in almost no time at all. Once he realized he was not supposed to be near me when I gave him the cue, he just walked off like "oh, is this all?" It took a little effort to teach him to trot, but once he learned the command and my body language it was automatic. The best thing was the first time I asked him to canter. He read my "go faster" body language and just picked it up like a seasoned horse. Actually, better than Bubba who has been trained and worked to canter on the lunge. I can put Shiner on a lunge anywhere and tell him what gait I want him at and he knows. Training really clicks with this horse and I love working with him.

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#4 ponygirl

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Posted 15 August 2010 - 02:55 AM

Well, I've shared quite a few stories about Bubba and I, so I'm going to share one about Shiner, my 2.5 y/o stud colt.
I taught him to lunge in almost no time at all. Once he realized he was not supposed to be near me when I gave him the cue, he just walked off like "oh, is this all?" It took a little effort to teach him to trot, but once he learned the command and my body language it was automatic. The best thing was the first time I asked him to canter. He read my "go faster" body language and just picked it up like a seasoned horse. Actually, better than Bubba who has been trained and worked to canter on the lunge. I can put Shiner on a lunge anywhere and tell him what gait I want him at and he knows. Training really clicks with this horse and I love working with him.

cool story!
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#5 Century Oak

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Posted 16 August 2010 - 01:10 AM

That's always a cool thing when something clicks and you realize what you are doing is working just wonderfully :) I had that last weekend with my guy, went to the trainers to ride and though I'd been riding, it was a struggle to communicate, we just weren't on the same channel. He would work for me just fine but that sync wasn't there if it made sense. Well last weekend I hopped up, and with the first leg yield everything fell into place. He responded to leg and rein cues, I could feel exactly where he was and what he was doing with his backend (and could correct it when needed) and my trainer said we had our best ride ever so far :) I was thrilled! It's just such an awesome feeling when you start to be able to communicate with them, maybe that's why I've always liked riding and training my own horses so much, I live for those moments when it "clicks" :)
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Guardian still to: Zandai Jasoor (Zandai Ibn Omar x Glorieta Saqlima) & Impress Rissala (Imtaarif x Zandai Om Roda)

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#6 VanAlma

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Posted 16 August 2010 - 11:51 AM

I totally agree with you about the first time it clicks. It is a good feeling and usually after that things start going smoother and better. As frustrating as it can be to train a horse instead of buy a finished one, it's so much more rewarding in the end.

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#7 larapintavian

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Posted 16 August 2010 - 12:46 PM

Chrissi loves starting the young ones and bringing them through the first 3 levels of Eventing competition for that very reason ..... it's SO great to feel that 'click'. not only in the very beginning, but each time a new skill is acquired. In Eventing, that means a LOT of 'clicks' over several years (and that super feeling) since it encompases three disciplines and progressive levels of each.

She's started the bare basics on both her long 2 yr old colts (purebred Arab and her hubby's HUGE perlino Paint). As expected, the Arab who had been handled daily since birth, learned extremely quickly and now has time off until next year. The BIG guy (already well over 16 hh) took a bit longer to gain confidence. but 'clicked' this week and suddenly became secure. Now we need to get them out in hand a bit for some experience away from home.
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#8 Century Oak

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Posted 16 August 2010 - 05:52 PM

That's the biggest reason I enjoy training my own as well, when you see something connect with them and you know it's working. It's very rewarding. I'm not beyond sending them off if need be, but really enjoy working with them as well. For me now, it's doubly enjoyable because I'm coming back after a long hiatus from serious riding, so I guess I'm seeing my own "clicks" as well, and when it's in time with a green horse it's an amazing feeling :bigemo_harabe_net-03:
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#9 VanAlma

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Posted 25 September 2010 - 07:42 PM

Well, I've got 2 "click" stories :)
Bubba and I have been working on going over trotting poles, very low fences and working on the basics: a consistent stride, lining the rear end up with the shoulder, and not ducking out. Well, today I was practicing with him and my husband came out so we raised the bar to about 1.5 feet. For those who have never jumped, it isn't high, but for a new horse to go over it seamlessly was awesome. He took it all in stride and only ducked out once and it was my fault because I wasn't riding him enough (we were at the seated trot - too early to canter). I am so proud! I'm not sure he'll be jumper material. At this point he's very casual, which doesn't always do well with high jumps. But he is so damn tall and just sits on his rear end and pops over them smoothly that I'll keep working him over them.
I have also been working on one of my new mares, Boo (Ana Abuka) that I got this summer. I've been working on desensitizing and she has really taken to me and my commands. She is probably the biggest pleaser I have. Anyway, the other day I got bold and pulled up a bucket and stood up on it and hopped up on her sideways and she just stood there! I did it from both sides and she was a really good girl. She knew I wanted her to stand so she did. Hopefully she'll be broke soon if I can get some consistency with her schedule.
It's so fun when it clicks.

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#10 VanAlma

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Posted 09 April 2011 - 05:16 PM

Bubba and I are clicking :) I am still working through some things, one of which was an abcess that prevented us from a show last weekend, but we are working slowly towards our goal of being show ready for sport horse.
He is consistent at the trot, needs some reminders not to die at the walk but when he realizes he's not done working yet, will walk out nicely and has been starting the extended / loose rein walk. The canter still needs work. Our leads are pretty solid but he still pops up during that transition and I have yet to figure out if it's me or him, but I will. He settles pretty quickly, though, although occastionally cross fires. I consulted Homer about his feet, have corrected that, and think it's a combination of feet and my seat and his condition. It's not a common occurance but I don't like it. We need more work at that gait but we have had slow, steady progress.
Just an aside - I had his teeth done and he is SO different on the rein and through the pole/neck. He was heavy on the left rein and that is where he had the biggest hooks / needed the most work. When I was young and training/showing I never got horses' teeth done. I didn't get them done for at least 10 years and then heard of a dentist in the area and had them done "just because". If you're riding or training and it's not clicking through the mouth/hands/pole/neck - please get your horse checked. I can't believe the difference in Bubba.

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#11 JacqueB

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Posted 10 April 2011 - 11:55 AM

Bubba and I are clicking :) I am still working through some things, one of which was an abcess that prevented us from a show last weekend, but we are working slowly towards our goal of being show ready for sport horse.
He is consistent at the trot, needs some reminders not to die at the walk but when he realizes he's not done working yet, will walk out nicely and has been starting the extended / loose rein walk.
I think that's pretty typical
The canter still needs work. Our leads are pretty solid but he still pops up during that transition and I have yet to figure out if it's me or him, but I will. He settles pretty quickly, though, although occastionally cross fires. I consulted Homer about his feet, have corrected that, and think it's a combination of feet and my seat and his condition. It's not a common occurance but I don't like it. We need more work at that gait but we have had slow, steady progress.
Maybe when you're at a show you'll have a knowledgeable friend who can watch you & they can see what's happening. Usually there is unused dressage arena/open flat space around.
Just an aside - I had his teeth done and he is SO different on the rein and through the pole/neck. He was heavy on the left rein and that is where he had the biggest hooks / needed the most work. When I was young and training/showing I never got horses' teeth done. I didn't get them done for at least 10 years and then heard of a dentist in the area and had them done "just because". If you're riding or training and it's not clicking through the mouth/hands/pole/neck - please get your horse checked. I can't believe the difference in Bubba.
Oh, that's why you asked me if the dental float made a difference for my mare...

I know the least about canter work on the dressage side, more working it for jumping, but that's getting to be so far away now that I might as well start all over again. But it seems to me when I've watched lessons being given & watching dressage tests that the canter is more tricky to get right for the transitions & keeping it in good form.
Thanks for the update & look forward to hearing what you figure out.
JacqueB



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