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#1 JacqueB

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Posted 30 November 2010 - 12:45 AM

My coming 9 yo broodmare has never been in great riding condition plus the last 3 years she's had 2 foals, latest 2/2010 and not been ridden. I'm wanting to take her to a training level dressage test in the Spring. I've been doing lunging (60 ft round pen) 5 rounds each way @ a walk & 5 each way @ a trot, sometimes as much as 4 days in a row but more often 3 days a week for ~ 3 weeks & then the last couple weeks 7 rounds @ a trot.
I've ridden her in the riding ring & round pen once each mostly walking for 10-15 minutes. She still seems like a bowl full of jelly.
When I do the finger presses on her belly/midline her back doesn't come up but maybe an inch, not much. When I do the pressure points along the sacrum~7 cm on each side, again her back doesn't come up that much.
So I think her muscles are really lax from carrying pregnancies & not doing anything athletically/gymnastically.
I rode her by herself up to the riding arena (~1/2 mile)& she was fine. We walked circles, serpentines. She's very easy, light contact is accepted & she gets the correct bend when I'm clear with my aids and I think she was probably doing some good over reaching with her back legs & she's reaching down intermittently for contact. Being very light in the saddle/almost half seat we did trot both ways each 1 time. She really shows her lack of conditioning with that effort.
The reason I decided to ride her more, was because she started being very difficult to get to walk out or trot on with lunging - I considered it passive/aggressive "I don't want to do this anymore" behavior.
My question is:
Can I work her twice a day for short spurts maybe 2-3 days a week. For example, in the morning, do the brief round pen work & let her out to pasture then in the afternoon come back & do some short riding either trail riding the hills around here or ring work or alittle of both, but keep it to 30-40 minutes. And still try to get an additional 2-3 days of riding for a total of 4-5 days of riding. I don't want to take her too fast or hard & get her sore. But I also have this spring deadline that I've set for us to do a training level dressage test- she's a long way from that right now. My priority is preparation for the spring dressage test, so given the ground is not too frozen or the rains not pouring or there's not a 20+mph cold wind, I'll be riding. But I need some input on bring my mare along respectful of her last 3 year's activities.
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#2 Marilee

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Posted 30 November 2010 - 07:43 PM

You have some very ambious goals for yourself and your mare, to accomplish that--- within a set frame of time. She is young, but has been not worked much before, and the key is to get her there WITHOUT INJURY. Too much pushing when she is out of shape, and something will (might) give. Her feet, her legs, her attitude. We did interval training too, ring work, and then lots of riding in the desert and in the mountains, as the horse matured physically and progressed in muscling and development. Mental health of the horses was never an issue, as we believed in doing lots of things other than just arena work. I've seen horses round pen worked too much too fast or too often (liberty, lunged, ridden) and then issues develop with their legs......So I would think that lots of walking in and out of the arena (trail riding) will develop SLOWLY the muscles/tendons/ligaments, so that any stretching/reconditioning of the body will be gradual and cumulative rather than suddenly and resulting in breakdown/lameness/weakness. I had an older Fadjur daughter than I returned under saddle, some lunging (not much), but mostly walking WITH A LONG NECK, and relaxation first, rather than tension, and then gradually when she was stronger, introducing the trot, not much canter either. I remember taking dressage lessons years ago, and how my mentor said how much depends on the WALK, and I know what he meant. Lots of turn out too, as that allows for the walk too and grazing down and away from the body, and stretching the back and muscles of the legs, all which will promote what you want.

#3 Marilee

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Posted 30 November 2010 - 07:46 PM

I forgot about the interval training, which we did arena lunging or riding/trail riding/mountain riding/free play or graze time, and DAYS OFF!!!!! One day this and one day that. But too much can be worse than not enough, as you do not want injury to a horse which is out of shape.

#4 JacqueB

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Posted 01 December 2010 - 12:59 AM

You have some very ambious goals for yourself and your mare, to accomplish that--- within a set frame of time.
Well it's a bit expansive, could be March-very unlikely, it could be May, much more likely, but might have to be June or July for a 65+ - I was hoping that it wasn't that ambitious actually.
She is young, but has been not worked much before, and the key is to get her there WITHOUT INJURY.
EXACTLY
Too much pushing when she is out of shape, and something will (might) give. Her feet, her legs, her attitude. We did interval training too, ring work, and then lots of riding in the desert and in the mountains, as the horse matured physically and progressed in muscling and development. Mental health of the horses was never an issue, as we believed in doing lots of things other than just arena work. I've seen horses round pen worked too much too fast or too often (liberty, lunged, ridden) and then issues develop with their legs......So I would think that lots of walking in and out of the arena (trail riding) will develop SLOWLY the muscles/tendons/ligaments, so that any stretching/reconditioning of the body will be gradual and cumulative rather than suddenly and resulting in breakdown/lameness/weakness. I had an older Fadjur daughter than I returned under saddle, some lunging (not much), but mostly walking WITH A LONG NECK, and relaxation first, rather than tension, and then gradually when she was stronger, introducing the trot, not much canter either. I remember taking dressage lessons years ago, and how my mentor said how much depends on the WALK, and I know what he meant.
Agreed. The side reins have been very long & at the elbow when lunging. She does the long low neck work with good reach/over stepping with the hind legs at the walk better in the riding ring. Trail riding she very alert/head up & never really relaxes, but I think she'll enjoy it, too. I've been getting off of her when I go down the steep hills & then hop back on at the bottom.
Lots of turn out too, as that allows for the walk too and grazing down and away from the body, and stretching the back and muscles of the legs, all which will promote what you want.
She lives out 24/7 on excellent pasture with a good shed & warm water for the winter.

Thanks for your thoughts Marilee, I appreciate your input.
JacqueB

#5 JacqueB

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Posted 01 December 2010 - 01:16 AM

I forgot about the interval training, which we did arena lunging or riding/trail riding/mountain riding/free play or graze time, and DAYS OFF!!!!! One day this and one day that. But too much can be worse than not enough, as you do not want injury to a horse which is out of shape.

Agreed. I've got a friend who trained her horse to top ten in the nation for 4 ft fences, jumpers not hunters & she was my jumper trainer. She likes to train 2 days 1 day off & repeat. Since I don't have an indoor arena my riding is a bit dictated by the weather. I've got someone to trail ride with most weeks ~ 2 days a week, the rest of the time I'll have to squeeze in lunging or arena/ring work or some combination. Just getting to the riding ring is a bit of a trail ride. She's getting more acclimated to the idea that she is a riding horse, she's so funny. She's easy going, so the first time you do something she just accepts it. But when she realizes this is happening regularly she'll start to give me some feedback, however, she's always so easy to talk into going along with the program.
I was able to contact the dressage trainer/rider Clare Salmon-Morrow today & she gave me the go ahead for my training plan. Now we'll see how the weather will let it play out. Raining today & tomorrow - gone for the w/e. Sunday, Monday & Thursday is all she'll get this week.
Thanks again Marilee for your thoughts.
JacqueB

#6 VanAlma

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Posted 01 December 2010 - 01:19 PM

While I have little experience conditioning a broodmare, I have quite a bit conditioning after long periods of nothingness :roflmao: When I lived up north, I didn't ride all winter (approx. Nov - early Mar) as I did not have an indoor arena and I hate the cold. My horses got about 8 hours of pasture a day at that time.
Come late March, I would start training as I always had 2 shows in May I liked to go to. I always used casual trail riding as an integral part of conditioning. I mostly walked, especially in the beginning, and always let their head go where they felt like it. It is great for conditioning the mind and body. Even in between shows, I would trail ride and there was no head set, no nothing, besides me and the horse going forward and over and through whatever. I always had pretty well-rounded horses even if they weren't showing.
As far as formal conditioning, I do a lot of seated trotting, LOTS, with large circles, and extended walking. This type of movement really forces you and the horse to focus their muscles, which is hard for both, and once that is done usually the working trot and canter come easier as they are warmed up by being conditioned slow and steady. I don't canter enough these days, so need to step it up if I think I'm going to show next spring.
Let us know how she progresses. My broomare is due early April and I'll be back on her by next fall. I'm not sure I'll show her but hubby and friends will ride her for pleasure.

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#7 hansi

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Posted 01 December 2010 - 01:26 PM

You have some very ambious goals for yourself and your mare, to accomplish that--- within a set frame of time. She is young, but has been not worked much before, and the key is to get her there WITHOUT INJURY. Too much pushing when she is out of shape, and something will (might) give. Her feet, her legs, her attitude. We did interval training too, ring work, and then lots of riding in the desert and in the mountains, as the horse matured physically and progressed in muscling and development. Mental health of the horses was never an issue, as we believed in doing lots of things other than just arena work. I've seen horses round pen worked too much too fast or too often (liberty, lunged, ridden) and then issues develop with their legs......So I would think that lots of walking in and out of the arena (trail riding) will develop SLOWLY the muscles/tendons/ligaments, so that any stretching/reconditioning of the body will be gradual and cumulative rather than suddenly and resulting in breakdown/lameness/weakness. I had an older Fadjur daughter than I returned under saddle, some lunging (not much), but mostly walking WITH A LONG NECK, and relaxation first, rather than tension, and then gradually when she was stronger, introducing the trot, not much canter either. I remember taking dressage lessons years ago, and how my mentor said how much depends on the WALK, and I know what he meant. Lots of turn out too, as that allows for the walk too and grazing down and away from the body, and stretching the back and muscles of the legs, all which will promote what you want.



getting injured in a "roundpen" is easy. I dont know who ever invented them. too much stress on the inside hindleg, and easily breakout over the shoulders. Ours has 4 straight walls and a45degree angle each corner side and we call it "workpen". It is easy to do the figure eight in a walk or trott, a very important exercise in it, harder or impossible in a "roundpen":

Even when riding, one does no really ride a "circle" but rides from point to point to point to point.

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#8 JacqueB

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Posted 01 December 2010 - 05:37 PM

While I have little experience conditioning a broodmare, I have quite a bit conditioning after long periods of nothingness :roflmao: When I lived up north, I didn't ride all winter (approx. Nov - early Mar) as I did not have an indoor arena and I hate the cold. My horses got about 8 hours of pasture a day at that time.
Come late March, I would start training as I always had 2 shows in May I liked to go to. I always used casual trail riding as an integral part of conditioning. I mostly walked, especially in the beginning, and always let their head go where they felt like it. It is great for conditioning the mind and body. Even in between shows, I would trail ride and there was no head set, no nothing, besides me and the horse going forward and over and through whatever. I always had pretty well-rounded horses even if they weren't showing.
As far as formal conditioning, I do a lot of seated trotting, LOTS, with large circles, and extended walking. This type of movement really forces you and the horse to focus their muscles, which is hard for both, and once that is done usually the working trot and canter come easier as they are warmed up by being conditioned slow and steady. I don't canter enough these days, so need to step it up if I think I'm going to show next spring.
Let us know how she progresses. My broomare is due early April and I'll be back on her by next fall. I'm not sure I'll show her but hubby and friends will ride her for pleasure.

Because the 20+mph winds weren't cold we got a short bit of lunging done today. She's getting much more consistent walking out or extended walking done with the long low side reins, good engagement of the hind end with the neck stretched out & low & nose past the vertical. Still inconsistent with the trotting work which I would expect with her muscling being so weak. But the attitude was much better. So mixing up riding lunge work seems to be working. I'll ride her tomorrow which will be by myself so we'll trail ride the 1/2 mile to the riding ring but I'll just stick to ring work & might not even try trotting just go for regular rhythm & correct bend on a long rein engaging the back end walking - typically I use spiral ins & outs for that as well as serpentines & might throw in walking up a couple more hills going & coming. Still sparing her the downhill - getting off. Hah, I just remembered that I've got cavelettis - maybe next week we'll get those out.
Between what you're saying about canter & Hansi's canter response looks like it will be March before we'll work on the canter. So that suggests to me that May is the more likely time we'll have some chance at a 60's score on a training level dressage test.
Thanks Kate.
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#9 JacqueB

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Posted 01 December 2010 - 05:41 PM

getting injured in a "roundpen" is easy. I dont know who ever invented them. too much stress on the inside hindleg, and easily breakout over the shoulders. Ours has 4 straight walls and a45degree angle each corner side and we call it "workpen". It is easy to do the figure eight in a walk or trott, a very important exercise in it, harder or impossible in a "roundpen":
Some day maybe I'll get a chance to build something like you're describing.

Even when riding, one does no really ride a "circle" but rides from point to point to point to point.
Good point :roflmao: 4 arcs.

Hansi

Thanks Hansi
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#10 VanAlma

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Posted 01 December 2010 - 11:38 PM

Because the 20+mph winds weren't cold we got a short bit of lunging done today. She's getting much more consistent walking out or extended walking done with the long low side reins, good engagement of the hind end with the neck stretched out & low & nose past the vertical. Still inconsistent with the trotting work which I would expect with her muscling being so weak. But the attitude was much better. So mixing up riding lunge work seems to be working. I'll ride her tomorrow which will be by myself so we'll trail ride the 1/2 mile to the riding ring but I'll just stick to ring work & might not even try trotting just go for regular rhythm & correct bend on a long rein engaging the back end walking - typically I use spiral ins & outs for that as well as serpentines & might throw in walking up a couple more hills going & coming. Still sparing her the downhill - getting off. Hah, I just remembered that I've got cavelettis - maybe next week we'll get those out.
Between what you're saying about canter & Hansi's canter response looks like it will be March before we'll work on the canter. So that suggests to me that May is the more likely time we'll have some chance at a 60's score on a training level dressage test.
Thanks Kate.

I didn't mean to sound like I was suggesting to avoid any work on the canter, it's just that I have found it hard to work green / underconditioned horses well at the canter as it takes a lot of balance and it is a gait they can get out from underneath you much easier than a trot. I'd work on the canter now, just right at the end of the session.
What I have been doing is working at the trot, and believe me this is once, maybe twice a week, and practice up transitions to the canter and back down with little regard to headset as long as he isn't throwing his head or doing anything "heavy" or indicative of avoidance. He's just now at a point where I can transition to a canter from the walk, so am working on crisp up transitions and much of it is done in a field so we can do large sweeping turns or long straight aways and just let him work himself at that gait without lots of interference. On those days we go up and down between all 3 gaits to help teach him how to listen to me and to teach myself what he reacts to best - which I just figured out the other day :Wine_glass_2:
Canter on!!!!!

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#11 JacqueB

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Posted 02 December 2010 - 11:17 AM

Glad you expanded on your piece. One thing, I don't think I'm clear to the horse on the canter depart. I've got a buddy of mine who took a Chincoteague pony to 2nd level, he's 20 something now & she offered to help me with the canter depart on him. I remember back in 2003 getting Tickled Pink to go from a walk to canter when we were schooling beginner novice fences, but I think she just read my mind rather than me knowing exactly what to do. My core strength is incredibly better now & I've got much better handle on what all six aids are doing at any given moment now than I did back then. So I don't think it will take much to get me precise so I can do a good job instructing Majiida & Bowie on canter depart. Back in 2007 when I had Majiida out in the hunt field for 2 hrs on a hunter pace she went into canter depart in a split second at the end of the 2 hrs acting like she was ready for another 2 hrs - lovely canter, will enjoy getting back to than.
Once I get farther along & start running out of ideas or think I need someone watching me to make sure I'm going in the right direction I'll be going back to my trainer, but I think that might be January for Bowie & maybe February for Majiida.
Such a contrast in horses, Bowie-Norwegian Fjord, drafty type, takes so much leg & core strength & absolute clarity with all six aids & initially dramatic insistence, now he's pretty light to the touch but still takes good strength. I ride Majiida second because she's much more reactive & I've got a good deep seat from riding Bowie, but she's light as a feather to aids & so much bigger trot.
Thanks Kate
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#12 VanAlma

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Posted 03 December 2010 - 02:55 AM

A tilt of the pelvis is what has really helped me up and down. When you want to canter, tilt your pelvis up, when you want to transition out of the canter, tilt it down. It helps A LOT. Bubba is very sensitive to me and my pressures and signals and often reads too much in to what I'm doing, so I am really working on conditioning myself. It has been quite a few years since a brought a young one along like this so I'm re-thinking everything and now trying to get my body to do what it once did without much thought.

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#13 JacqueB

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Posted 03 December 2010 - 04:15 AM

A tilt of the pelvis is what has really helped me up and down.
Tilting up was about my very first lesson in riding - up means go, down means slow
When you want to canter, tilt your pelvis up, when you want to transition out of the canter, tilt it down. It helps A LOT. Bubba is very sensitive to me and my pressures and signals and often reads too much in to what I'm doing, so I am really working on conditioning myself. It has been quite a few years since a brought a young one along like this so I'm re-thinking everything and now trying to get my body to do what it once did without much thought.

Green, especially green & young horses do pretty much exactly what you are telegraphing them :PerspectMA19366318-0001: which if I wasn't getting what I thought I should be getting, usually meant I wasn't being clear in my aids or giving the wrong information! The difference between a trainer who is very clear with their aids & supporting the horse & someone like me who is willing to try & decent at staying on. Today I wasn't getting from Bowie what I thought I should be, so I had to evaluate what I was doing & make adjustments which was successful. At least now I've got the strength to maintain proper aids to support the horse & not get frustrated so both the horse & myself can relax into the work.
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#14 mar

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Posted 03 December 2010 - 08:10 AM

I also dont like round pen work. Too much stress for legs especially in young/unconditioned horses, easy to injure. Especially if the surface is not perfect.

For the trail ride, 1 mile is really nothing (enough for warm up and cool down in walk if you dont work hard). Maybe for the first several lessons under saddle for a young horse. You can do 3-5 miles (or 1 to 1 and half hour) right from the beginning, mostly walk, a bit of trot. 5-10 miles later, I dont think there is much reason to do more when conditioning for dressage. I dont avoid slow canter on the trail, if the horse offers it itself. Once they get balance under saddle, they usually offer it. I dont work in canter in „riding place“ (sorry dont know the right english word here, I hope you understand) with young unconditioned horse for the first few months.

I would say this: right now, you need to condition your horse and she needs to find a balance under saddle. I would do more trail work and some work in "riding place" now. Later, you need to prepare for your dressage test, so you do much more work in "riding place" and a little bit of trail riding to relax.

#15 JacqueB

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Posted 03 December 2010 - 12:42 PM

Mar,
As time goes on, I think my round pen work has become more like starting a horse back under saddle & getting acquainted again with instruction. Yesterday I took her out @4:45 pm, getting pretty dim & I talked to her & told her that I was like Ruth, "wither thou goest I will go" & focused on sitting deep with good weight in my thighs, too, & stroked her neck often & we were fine. We went the 1/2 mi to the riding ring & did spirals in & out at a walk, she was relaxed but didn't really work & then we went back - was getting so dark I could see Christmas light starting to show up in the valley. But what we got out of our 1/2 hour ride was confidence in each other while trail riding all by ourselves. So I think you're idea of trail riding to condition her may work out since we are getting back to trail riding by ourselves. I forgot to get off of her ~ 1/3 the way down a pretty steep hill but she was very steady & balanced so I just stood in the stirrups & gave her the reins & we were fine. One thing I noticed was the ability to keep my ankles relaxed while ring her as opposed to riding Bowie. I was pondering on this and I think the difference is how responsive she is to adjustments in hip & leg aids whereas he is still taking so much leg to effect a change I've got more tension there - have to work on getting him lighter to leg.
thanks, Mar.
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#16 hansi

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Posted 03 December 2010 - 03:58 PM

While I have little experience conditioning a broodmare, I have quite a bit conditioning after long periods of nothingness :PerspectMA19366318-0001: When I lived up north, I didn't ride all winter (approx. Nov - early Mar) as I did not have an indoor arena and I hate the cold. My horses got about 8 hours of pasture a day at that time.
Come late March, I would start training as I always had 2 shows in May I liked to go to. I always used casual trail riding as an integral part of conditioning. I mostly walked, especially in the beginning, and always let their head go where they felt like it. It is great for conditioning the mind and body. Even in between shows, I would trail ride and there was no head set, no nothing, besides me and the horse going forward and over and through whatever. I always had pretty well-rounded horses even if they weren't showing.
As far as formal conditioning, I do a lot of seated trotting, LOTS, with large circles, and extended walking. This type of movement really forces you and the horse to focus their muscles, which is hard for both, and once that is done usually the working trot and canter come easier as they are warmed up by being conditioned slow and steady. I don't canter enough these days, so need to step it up if I think I'm going to show next spring.
Let us know how she progresses. My broomare is due early April and I'll be back on her by next fall. I'm not sure I'll show her but hubby and friends will ride her for pleasure.



Kate

a sitting trot is okay, but you can tie up the muscle system of the back. Once tight, you can never undo it. A young or started horse should be posted, giving no weight to the back at all, until that muscle system strengthened.

Most important is to control that outside hind leg, meaning your outside rein is ALWAYS dead on, like a stick so straight. Of course with those "halfhalts" each time you queeze with your inside leg on its inside girth, you catch it with a HALFHALT on the outside rain. It is always inside lege against outside rein.

A young horse MUST be supported with a snaffle bit-large enough to fit.
I use bits with a ring, not a Dbit. Without this support you can not possibly gymnastizise the horse, cant get that rearend under deep enough,
and cant bend the benders and stretch the stretchers. It takes time to achive a proper bend (vertebraes) and circles,serpentines,diagonales etc are the answer. Without the use of a snafle properLy, you cant negotiate the "CORNERS" EITHER, BECAUSE YOU HAVE TO RIDE INTO IT DEADONE AND THEN WITH YOUR BODY AND REIN AIDS DIRECT THE HORSE around it.

Seldom do I see a rider negotiating corners correctly, its always a "noodle" and achieves NOTHING, MORE SO IT DESTROYS.

And you always ride through your hips, must learn to feel where each foot sets down and notice when one sets down 2 inches shorter than the other. You can feel that in your hips.Its sort of a jerking affair,although very,very light.

I am sad to say that I have seen very few dressage riders/trainers here who executed all gymnastic figures correctly and/or taught to do so.

My teachers said: it takes 5 years to train up to the Grand Prix under a coach, takes a super school horse to assist, and another 5 years before one can train a Horse. This is so true.

Of course "training" can be anything. If you tickle that horse long enough behind the left ear to have it canter, it will do it. But these are gymmicks.

Lunging is an ART. Only if one can ride well, can one lunge. One has to watch the entire muscle system, make sure the horse is NOT running in each gate, but relaxes eventually in its back and engage properly from behind and breathes properly therefore you longeline is equal to the reins and your longe whip are YOUR LEGS. What you drive from behind, you must catch infront.
Otherwise the horse just noodles through the district.

If I may offer an advice, get the Egon Von Neindorf vidio and you will
learn from that great master how a young horse and/or rider is started out, and movements up to the Hote de cole. By the way THERE ARE NO SHORTCUTS!!!

Hansi
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#17 JacqueB

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Posted 07 December 2010 - 12:24 PM

Kate

a sitting trot is okay, but you can tie up the muscle system of the back. Once tight, you can never undo it. A young or started horse should be posted, giving no weight to the back at all, until that muscle system strengthened.

Most important is to control that outside hind leg, meaning your outside rein is ALWAYS dead on, like a stick so straight. Of course with those "halfhalts" each time you queeze with your inside leg on its inside girth, you catch it with a HALFHALT on the outside rain. It is always inside lege against outside rein.
The 12 yo I've got trading farm work for riding one of my horses with instruction, she's just an eager beginner & my horse is unreliable on the lunge line, so she has less than ideal conditions for riding instructions. But I'm finding in non-talented individuals getting that correct use of the hips especially @ the L/S with correct weight so you can work with the other 4 aids is not an easy concept to instruct. It's been interesting to keep working at it from a teacher & student point of view. We're not frustrated yet, but it's a work in progress. But it's clear that if you don't have the correct use of hips/lower back keeping the 2 track system in mind then the 4 other aids won't matter, the horse just "noodles" into what is easier, using their strong side. It would be great if we all had the opportunity to start for 6 mo on a lunge line on a well trained horse, but maybe we can learn well what we need to & not be unkind to the horse at the same time since our options are limited. Thanks for being my online "instructor" reinforcing my trainers instructions until I get to her riding arena!

A young horse MUST be supported with a snaffle bit-large enough to fit.
I use bits with a ring, not a Dbit. Without this support you can not possibly gymnastizise the horse, cant get that rearend under deep enough,
I've been using for years now the loose ring snaffle, except Fanci, she never got out of the fat rubber snaffle. If I had been able to continue her riding career I would have had to go to the loose ring snaffle for saliva stim.
and cant bend the benders and stretch the stretchers. It takes time to achive a proper bend (vertebraes) and circles,serpentines,diagonales etc are the answer. Without the use of a snafle properLy, you cant negotiate the "CORNERS" EITHER, BECAUSE YOU HAVE TO RIDE INTO IT DEADONE AND THEN WITH YOUR BODY AND REIN AIDS DIRECT THE HORSE around it.

Seldom do I see a rider negotiating corners correctly, its always a "noodle" and achieves NOTHING, MORE SO IT DESTROYS.

And you always ride through your hips, must learn to feel where each foot sets down
This is an area which I'm am determined to pay much more attention to - footfalls. My trainer has always emphasized riding thru the hips, I realize that I need to know foot falls so I can time instruction appropriately with aids. At least my core is stronger so I can be stable for the horse to come back into balance.
and notice when one sets down 2 inches shorter than the other. You can feel that in your hips.Its sort of a jerking affair,although very,very light.

I am sad to say that I have seen very few dressage riders/trainers here who executed all gymnastic figures correctly and/or taught to do so.

My teachers said: it takes 5 years to train up to the Grand Prix under a coach, takes a super school horse to assist, and another 5 years before one can train a Horse. This is so true.

Of course "training" can be anything. If you tickle that horse long enough behind the left ear to have it canter, it will do it. But these are gymmicks.

Lunging is an ART. Only if one can ride well, can one lunge. One has to watch the entire muscle system, make sure the horse is NOT running in each gate, but relaxes eventually in its back and engage properly from behind and breathes properly therefore you longeline is equal to the reins and your longe whip are YOUR LEGS. What you drive from behind, you must catch infront.
Otherwise the horse just noodles through the district.

If I may offer an advice, get the Egon Von Neindorf vidio
I'll look for it, thanks
and you will
learn from that great master how a young horse and/or rider is started out, and movements up to the Hote de cole. By the way THERE ARE NO SHORTCUTS!!!

Hansi


JacqueB

#18 JacqueB

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Posted 08 December 2010 - 05:50 PM

"If I may offer an advice, get the Egon Von Neindorf vidio"
Hansi, I looked online & saw one reference to a German video I think was associated with Egon Von Neindorf.
And Amazon has a book by him also in English. But he's out of the Spanish riding school just like
Alos Podhajsky & I've got his book. Are you familiar with him/his book? Is there some reason you prefer Von Neindorf?
JacqueB

#19 anitae

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Posted 09 December 2010 - 04:19 AM

Hi, J,
Just one additional thought. With my loooong layoff (not able to ride), I've had lots of practice needing to work horses in-hand to keep them in some sort of shape, especially the broodmares. Yes, they get bored with lunging. My salvation has been the Klimke book on cavaletti (its just "Cavaletti: The Schooling of Horse and Rider Over Ground Poles" by Reiner and Ingrid Klimke). Trotting over poles really forces the horse to hold that tummy up. I mix-in some cavaletti work with other ground work to decrease the boredom. Important, as you know, to get the horse warmed up before asking for that work.

Anita

#20 JacqueB

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Posted 09 December 2010 - 12:33 PM

Hi, J,
Just one additional thought. With my loooong layoff (not able to ride), I've had lots of practice needing to work horses in-hand to keep them in some sort of shape, especially the broodmares. Yes, they get bored with lunging. My salvation has been the Klimke book on cavaletti (its just "Cavaletti: The Schooling of Horse and Rider Over Ground Poles" by Reiner and Ingrid Klimke). Trotting over poles really forces the horse to hold that tummy up. I mix-in some cavaletti work with other ground work to decrease the boredom. Important, as you know, to get the horse warmed up before asking for that work.

Anita

thanks Anita, I've got a book on Cavaletti work & a video, I'll check & see if it's Klimke/Reiner, I think it might be - good idea, I can do that in the riding ring. Right now I'm waiting for it to get above freezing without 20+ mph winds
JacqueB



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