Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

Cancer- Genetic?


  • Please log in to reply
6 replies to this topic

#1 firepanther

firepanther

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 109 posts
  • Location:GA- for now
  • Interests:I am interesting in horses of all kinds and would like to continue learning about SE Arabians. I enjoy reading, writing, drawing and doing things outdoors.

Posted 09 March 2012 - 02:22 PM

I am wondering, are there any strains that are known to have a high rate of death due to cancer? Is it even something heavily looked into yet (or will it ever be)?
I know gray horses in general are more prone to melanoma so just thought I'd see if there's been any research into specific lines developing cancer.
Thanks!

#2 Heidi

Heidi

    Advanced Member

  • Root Admin
  • PipPipPip
  • 2,775 posts

Posted 09 March 2012 - 05:14 PM

I;ve never heard of a stud done.

BINT SAFIERA 2000 Bay mare
SHAMS EL BINA 2002 Bay mare
NAKHDA AL SHAIB 2004 Grey Gelding<---- AL
SIHR JAWHER 2006 Bay Stallion
NADEERAH ALIAH 2006 Bay mare
ZAHRAN HAMRAH 2006 Grey mare
SHAMS FIDAT 2012 grey filly SKYLER the 1/2 Arabian pinto wonder horse


#3 sheikh rissan

sheikh rissan

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 791 posts
  • Location:Surrey, England
  • Interests:Oncology, Medicine, Arab Horses (obviously!), Driving Cars, Reading, Cooking, Eating, Pilates.... not in any particular order.

Posted 12 March 2012 - 11:35 PM

http://www.nature.co.../pdf/ng.185.pdf

Is what I found re Melanoma being linked to a particular mutation..
From what else I could find, it seems that horses are not as likely as humans to suffer from cancer.. that cancers, if suffered from, are often known only after autopsy. Lymphosarcoma does appear as one relatively common equine cancer, but it wasn't linked to genetics.
I work in the Oncology field, and even in humans, most cancers are sporadic (occur by chance) and are in fact a disease of ageing. In humans, the known genetically linked ones have incidence rates of 2-3 percent (ballpark only - gross generalisation for perspective - and dependent upon the type of cancer you are referring to)..
To be honest, people don't do proper randomised clinical trials on horses with cancer... at least not in the numbers found in humans. I know the equine genome has been mapped, but I think it will be a while before the equine cancer genome (for whichever cancer site) is mapped with enough precision to give us the information we would need.. it would take many many samples of tissue to do this...
  • Nadj Al Nur and diane like this
Julia

Kalinin ibn Baletina - 2001 Metallic Chestnut Stallion, Double Balaton
Strain: Hadban Enzahi (TF Elsissa DB 1870)
SCID, CA and LFS Clear.. Testing Centre VHL Holland

Sire: Kais
Pakistan (Kumir/Panagia) x Proba (Balaton/Palmira)
Dam: Baletina bint Inez
Balaton (Menes/Panagia) x Indirah bint Inez (Kauri/Shams el Inez)


Al Zomorood Arabian Stud

Allbreed Pedigree - Kalinin ibn Baletina

#4 VanAlma

VanAlma

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,602 posts

Posted 16 March 2012 - 11:03 PM

This is an interesting topic. I don't have a ton of experience with it, but I do have a grey mare with melanomas. Nothing horrible but I'm sure her ultimate demise will be cancer. Interestingly, her bay half sister has a big growth on her jowl. That's not something you hear about often with bays and I wouldn't normally think anything of it if they didn't share the same daddy. Quite possibly genetics or just a fluke? Who knows. Being a person who had a similar type of cancer that my uncle had years ago, it is fascinating work and do feel there are some genetic pre-dispositions, if you will ;)

Van Alma Arabians
Find us on Facebook!


#5 firepanther

firepanther

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 109 posts
  • Location:GA- for now
  • Interests:I am interesting in horses of all kinds and would like to continue learning about SE Arabians. I enjoy reading, writing, drawing and doing things outdoors.

Posted 17 March 2012 - 01:48 AM

Thanks for the responses. I have tried to find information on equine cancer but even on the internet there is little about it. I guess that can be viewed as a good thing since it isn't as likely to occur in horses as in some other species.
I lost my cat Shadow to cancer and lost my horse Misty to cancer. Both came on rapidly and there was nothing we could do by the time it was found. Sudden weight loss, no appetite, not using the bathroom as much.
I guess I'm a little paranoid now, I really don't want to go through with losing another animal so unexpecedly. Hopefully more research can be done so there is more information on horses and cancer for the future

#6 VanAlma

VanAlma

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,602 posts

Posted 18 March 2012 - 05:02 PM

Sorry you lost 2 babies to it. It often is rapid because they can't tell you the "off" symptoms they are feeling even if it doesn't show.
I can't remember where I heard this, but someone lost a 5 y/o palomino to cancer. They had an autopsy done because it was so quick and unexpected. Found tumors throughout the body.
I have a feeling it occurs in the lighter colors, but imagine it happens everywhere. Will be interesting to hear if any more research comes out about it.

Van Alma Arabians
Find us on Facebook!


#7 calicoarab52

calicoarab52

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 373 posts
  • Location:Yermo, CA USA
  • Interests:race/sporthorses, bad kitties.Labrador retrievers, country /celtic music and blues rock.

Posted 25 March 2012 - 03:27 AM

I do not know about any particular families that are known to be prone to cancer, but with my bad experiences, I will NOT breed two horses together that are both homozygous for grey. I had a stunning *Ibn El Balad dtr. out of a Malik dtr. who I lost at only 8 years old to "multiple masses in the abdomen". Unfortunately, I did not have the money at that time to have a necropsy /cytology lab work up. But BOTH of Basras' parents were homozygous for grey, and both died from cancer- the sire to a strangulating abdominal lipoma, and the dam to melanomas. I will add, however, that both sire & dam were in their 20s'. Basra started showing mild symptoms at 6 years old, with mild colic episodes that became increasing in both frequency and intensity. I look back now with hindsite, and wish I had been more aggressive on the lab work earlier, but no sense beating ones' self up longafter the fact. I spent a small fortune in vet bills at a time when I was not really in a position to do so, and in the end, even surgery was not an option, as the masses grew too large, too fast.

Sorry for your losses, it is always so hard to say good bye to our animal friends!

Sandy C




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users