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#1 diane

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Posted 23 July 2013 - 12:40 PM

Looking for a new bit.  I'm in need of a little more control with very keen horses when out on an endurance ride, particularly for the first 15-20klm.   Training is fine... it's just the rides themselves so looking for a very kind bit which allows for easy grazing and drinking but says no when needed in a nice way.

 

At the moment am considering the Myler range though open to suggestions.


cheers, diane
Agecroft, Australia


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#2 VanAlma

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Posted 23 July 2013 - 04:00 PM

I was going to suggest Mylers as well. Bubba does, from time to time, need a stronger reminder than just a bitless when I am on his back. I also let him graze on the trail. Having a bit isn't ideal but he seems to be able to munch somewhat with it in. I also find no head-tossing or resistance with these bits.


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#3 diane

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Posted 23 July 2013 - 08:50 PM

I was going to suggest Mylers as well. Bubba does, from time to time, need a stronger reminder than just a bitless when I am on his back. I also let him graze on the trail. Having a bit isn't ideal but he seems to be able to munch somewhat with it in. I also find no head-tossing or resistance with these bits.

 

thanks, Kate.


cheers, diane
Agecroft, Australia


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#4 VanAlma

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Posted 03 November 2013 - 02:30 PM

Diane - I saw you mention a Baucher bit on the Ravenwood Quatahn thread. Can you elaborate more? Never heard of it. Experiences with it? Thanks


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#5 Loriwoo

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Posted 04 November 2013 - 12:06 AM

People often don't think of it but a very skinny snaffle is a good bit to have.  Copper mouth makes it soft and when you aren't using the reins, it is like the bit is not even there for the horse, because it is so skinny.

They can easily eat around it and manipulate mouthfuls of hay or grass around it easily.

When you need to use it, you can use it lightly and if you really need it, the small mouthpiece will say "hello" without cutting them.

I like the copper one with the really big O rings. The big O keeps the bit from going through the mouth, but doesn't lay against the face like a full cheek.  

They have nice ones from Schnieders,

www.sstack.com



#6 BettyK

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Posted 04 November 2013 - 02:58 AM

Kate,

 

Not Diane...but I've used the Baucher on my horses for years and am extremely pleased with it.  It is very mild and cannot jab the horse in the top of the mouth as a simple jointed snaffle can.  I found this text from a poster on a horse forum, and I think it pretty well covers the bases about the French link Baucher: 

 

"The Baucher snaffle hangs from its upper rings not unlike a Pelham. What this does is "suspend" the bit in the horse's mouth so that when you are not actually pulling on it, contact is minimal--the bit is not lying on the horse's tongue or bars. Many people find this begets less resistance.

By definition, since it has no shank below the mouthpiece, the bit cannot offer "leverage" like a curb or Pelham. However, it may offer a tiny tweak of the poll which can be an enormous asset at a show with a horse who regularly goes in a Pelham or double bridle at home--he will offer the same flexion reflex as easily as though he was still wearing it!

 

I am not a fan of thick mouthpieces in general, and not every horse goes well in a triple-piece mouth, however well designed; some love them, some don't. In general, any bit that conforms, as these do, to the natural shape of the horse's mouth should be more comfortable than one that breaks in a pointed "nutcracker" shape.

One test to give any snaffle: Raise your forearm vertical and wrap the bit around it just below the elbow, and with the mouthpiece against the sensitive part of your inner arm, pull back on the rings and see if it pinches your skin. If it does, it may likely be doing the same thing to your horse's tongue. I've been surprised many times at how truly "pinchy" many of the supposedly most humane bits can really be!

The Baucher is always one of my go-to bits for horses having "issues" with bit acceptance."

 

Hope you find this helpful...


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Betty K.

Arabest Kaliel (Arabest Kalid x Arabest Denabiela)
Ravenwood Qahtahn (Qahtahn x Ravenwood Gemmone)
El Ghorab Sneferu (GAF Mosaad x Stonehedge Fateza) - Sadly lost 6/6/10
Tsynful Sensation (Simeon Sanegor x Woodhill Tsabrina) - Forever in my heart, lost 8/8/11
Misty Sue (Tuhotmos x Aramasumara) - Our first Arabian and missed so very much (1975-2004)

#7 BettyK

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Posted 04 November 2013 - 03:03 AM

I meant to give you a link that shows what it looks like in case you're interested:

 

http://www.doversadd...CFeHm7Aod03gAWQ


Betty K.

Arabest Kaliel (Arabest Kalid x Arabest Denabiela)
Ravenwood Qahtahn (Qahtahn x Ravenwood Gemmone)
El Ghorab Sneferu (GAF Mosaad x Stonehedge Fateza) - Sadly lost 6/6/10
Tsynful Sensation (Simeon Sanegor x Woodhill Tsabrina) - Forever in my heart, lost 8/8/11
Misty Sue (Tuhotmos x Aramasumara) - Our first Arabian and missed so very much (1975-2004)

#8 BettyK

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Posted 04 November 2013 - 03:16 AM

Diane,

 

Here's a most informative article on bits and nosebands:

 

http://www.sustainab...tack/bridle.php


Betty K.

Arabest Kaliel (Arabest Kalid x Arabest Denabiela)
Ravenwood Qahtahn (Qahtahn x Ravenwood Gemmone)
El Ghorab Sneferu (GAF Mosaad x Stonehedge Fateza) - Sadly lost 6/6/10
Tsynful Sensation (Simeon Sanegor x Woodhill Tsabrina) - Forever in my heart, lost 8/8/11
Misty Sue (Tuhotmos x Aramasumara) - Our first Arabian and missed so very much (1975-2004)

#9 VanAlma

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Posted 04 November 2013 - 01:40 PM

Thanks Betty - I have seen those. I just never knew what they were called. I'll have to keep that in mind if I ever have bitting issues. Right now, I have 2 Mylers, 1 O-ring and 1 D-ring. They are thin and I really like them - no head tossing or anything. Bubba didn't do well on a single joint. Would not get onto the bit and would toss here and there. I have lots of double jointed snaffles, but leave them in my barn and trailer for extras just in case someone needs one.


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#10 diane

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Posted 09 November 2013 - 01:26 AM

thanks, Betty.  An impressive looking article and the bits (no pun intended) that I did read, ring true :) 

 

Over the years, for different reasons, I've collected a few bits, including two Waterford Baucher bits - two different makes.  I bought the second hoping that it was a smaller diameter Waterford part.  Marginal at best compared to the first and I still feel a little too thick for Arabians.

 

8029-14-140-Bau_P_med.jpg

dbimage_file_ZGJfaW1hZ2VzL3Byb2R1Y3QvcHJthe waterford part is the same as the first Waterford Baucher that I bought - it's rounder than the Neue Schule brand.

I haven't ridden them in the Waterford Baucher bits in an endurance ride because my thoughts are that that's a lot of bit to be carrying around for a minimum of 4+hours.  They're not light weight bits.

 

I bought a Myler bit (perhaps similar weight to the WB! (will have to weigh them)) and he's responded well to this but currently he's on holiday ie not training and no rides before 2014.  Time will tell.  Training isn't the issue; its the ride, the excitement of the ride, itself.

g_mbits_3Rcombo_short.jpg < this style though mine has the English style nose band and more port to the bit > g_mbits_combo_parts.gif

 

One of the bits that I have is a Wilson bit - used for harness work rather than the conventional Liverpool bits that are shanked (with various levels of pressure). 

Wilson bit>wilsonsnaffle.jpg The cheek strap is either buckled around both rings (for a softer bit) or to the loose ring.  The reins, can either be around both rings or the secure/bitted ring.  If separate - reins and cheek strap is buckled around the separate rings, then the snaffle is harsher as well as ring pressure (the trapped ring holding the cheek strap).


cheers, diane
Agecroft, Australia


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#11 Ray

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Posted 09 November 2013 - 02:14 AM

I like the Jim Warner mechanical hackamore with 7-inch cheek.  The nose band is harsh, so I wrap it with a soft shoelace, or something similar.



#12 BettyK

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Posted 09 November 2013 - 03:14 AM

You do have to be very careful with the mechanical hackamore.  I have a horse that suffered the consequences of someone who had no clue how they worked or how severe they can be.  He was messed up from his jaw through his poll and everywhere in between and would throw his head around (dangerously so) until the chiropractor and massage therapist were able to fix him.  Not saying it's something never to be used...just that you (not you specifically, Ray) need to be educated on what you put on a horse's head.


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Betty K.

Arabest Kaliel (Arabest Kalid x Arabest Denabiela)
Ravenwood Qahtahn (Qahtahn x Ravenwood Gemmone)
El Ghorab Sneferu (GAF Mosaad x Stonehedge Fateza) - Sadly lost 6/6/10
Tsynful Sensation (Simeon Sanegor x Woodhill Tsabrina) - Forever in my heart, lost 8/8/11
Misty Sue (Tuhotmos x Aramasumara) - Our first Arabian and missed so very much (1975-2004)

#13 diane

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Posted 09 November 2013 - 10:04 PM

I've used the light weight endurance 'hackamore' with Fada and he was comfortable with this.  It was more to go bitless than restraint so it worked well for Fada.  Trying the same bit on Fahraj in training and I didn't have confidence with it with him - just a feeling that he didn't like it.

 

post-348-0-09200800-1383166130.jpg


cheers, diane
Agecroft, Australia


Is there an elephant in the room?

#14 diane

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Posted 10 November 2013 - 04:02 AM

Weighing the bits... the Myler is the heaviest but not by much 10-15grams (compared to the Waterford Bauchers) and it does have the nose band and chin strap attached.  All other bits were weighed bare.   The lightest of the bits was a small ring, thin, double jointed snaffle.  All the bits that I have are stainless steel; brass or combined with sweet iron.  The port mouthed, shanked western bit that I have is a similar weight without the strap to the Myler.  The two Waterford Baucher bits are within grams of each other and similar weight to the port Spanish snaffle(?) / kimblewick.

$(KGrHqNHJDcFISg-rZiCBSHHu(hmRQ~~60_35.J

 

 

The Waterford Baucher bits when compared to a double jointed thick ringed snaffle that I have are similar in size.

DSC_0466.jpg

 

The Wilson bit is quite thick through the mouth piece, though tappers to the joint.


cheers, diane
Agecroft, Australia


Is there an elephant in the room?

#15 Ray

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Posted 10 November 2013 - 04:11 PM

You do have to be very careful with the mechanical hackamore.  I have a horse that suffered the consequences of someone who had no clue how they worked or how severe they can be.  He was messed up from his jaw through his poll and everywhere in between and would throw his head around (dangerously so) until the chiropractor and massage therapist were able to fix him.  Not saying it's something never to be used...just that you (not you specifically, Ray) need to be educated on what you put on a horse's head.

Yes, I guess that advice applies to everything about training.  My friend uses the hackamore I mentioned to correct the same problems you mentioned, which were caused by someone who had no clue on bits.     





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