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Ground Driving The Long Yearling Colt


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#21 JacqueB

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Posted 22 October 2013 - 10:01 AM

Got Grandbabies coming

1240474_10101425395078749_1603156874_n.jpg

 

So the colt & I are taking a breather

Talk to y'all next week!


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#22 JacqueB

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Posted 30 October 2013 - 01:46 AM

We've been working almost every day on Parelli's tail tip to nose.  He'll let me get his tail now and I can easily bring his nose to his tail without him moving and now I'm able to hold him in that position for about 15 sec, we're working up to the minute.  I'll get back to the grooming/bridling/cross tying here shortly.


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#23 JacqueB

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Posted 12 November 2013 - 09:28 PM

Too many distractions, finally getting back to tying/grooming/hoof picking daily the last few days and picked up the Parelli tail tip to nose again. 

Ancy the first day of tying him again.  But that stopped the 2nd day and today with the wind whipping & temperatures dropping, he stood perfectly still even when I was putting his blanket on.  I'm hoping to get back to putting his bridle on daily and putting the reins on. 

I guess I'm going to borrow pony front shipping boots & polo wrap his legs when we go back over to Amethyst Acres for ground driving him.

Don't give up on me, I don't have folks coming in for Thanksgiving, so hopefully I can get back working towards driving him over the next month.


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#24 JacqueB

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Posted 14 November 2013 - 09:24 PM

It happened!!  One of my retiree's owner came to visit & she's an FEI dressage rider and has lots of experience starting youngsters and general experience with many breeds.  So she came right in this morning and we were going to ground drive the colt!  I told her of the colts ignorance and so with his bridle on she took him out to the little enclosure and very closely lunged him at a walk first one way than the other, maybe 5 times around each way which was easy enough.  Then we clipped a light weight lunge line on each side she stayed to the inside and I was to the outside and we asked him to walk in a circle which he did - 5 times each way.  There was hesitation here and there, but no refusals or acting up, he was really quite willing albeit easily distracted.  Then I clipped a lead rope on my side and he walked beside me, but I had no tension on the lead rope and we did figure eights and various redirections which were all managed by her ground driving him.  Again hesitations, head moving high then low but no refusals and quite willing.  We probably worked with him 20-25 minutes, all very pleasant with him relaxed and happy when we asked for a halt at the end of ground driving.  IT WAS GREAT!  loved having someone to work with and it was all the same things I had done with his dam back in 2007, but I sure did enjoy the refresher!


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#25 Loriwoo

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Posted 14 November 2013 - 11:40 PM

was he bridled or in a halter?   Did you have a surcingle to run the lines through?  Was he saddled?  Just curious



#26 JacqueB

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Posted 15 November 2013 - 12:59 AM

He was bridled and we used the D ring fat rubber snaffle.  I hadn't put it on him for some weeks but he had gotten quiet with it in place previously.  He hadn't been lunged before, so she did it very undemandingly keeping about 5 ft between her and the colt.  I've not put a surcingle or saddle on him, so we didn't try to do that today.  She would allow the lines to come against his butt & even slide down onto his hocks and he was pretty non-reactive.  He was really quite quiet about everything we did.  Working together with her on the inside of the lunging circle and I'm on the outside was very effective and it was easy to transition him to outright ground driving by one person.  She was real good at giving gentle squeezes on the her line and getting him responsive to that.  He was very tender/responsive to the bit.  I rode his dam for a long time on the fat snaffle & only tried a loose ring snaffle when we needed to develop salvation.  My Norwegian Fjord disrespected that fat snaffle almost immediately. 

Since I'm by myself again I'll probably work on saddling & using a surcingle. I can work on brief lunging as well.


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#27 Loriwoo

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Posted 15 November 2013 - 06:03 PM

yeah I always teach mine to longe first, so you should have no problem with that, working by yourself it makes things easier...



#28 JacqueB

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Posted 24 December 2013 - 04:04 PM

Tho't I'd share a break thru with the colt.  Lot of changes on the farm, got a new retiree, took awhile to get things arranged so everyone was happy which put the colt in a paddock by himself across from the non-fescue mare field.  I got the go ahead from those more experienced than myself that 18 mo is not too young to have a colt by himself in a paddock adjacent to horses.  Especially since he's likely to stay entire.  When I tie him to work he's isolated in the shed.  So that's new for him and he was fine for grooming, standing still and enjoying the experience.  Now this colt has been having his feet picked up since a week or two of age.  So when he started getting alittlel kicky with his right hind again I kicked him back & got in his face and kept screaming at him til he dropped that head.  I stayed in place and as soon as he dropped that head I started sweet talking to him and explained that he needed to be a good boy and I needed his cooperation and started scratching his withers and went back to the right hind and talked reassuring and he was perfectly still.  I've done him 4 times since then & he's been perfect.  It's been very wet here, so I've been treating him with thrushbuster in his clefts & some spots in his frogs, then applying hoof moisturizer to his frog, heels & outside hoof.  So I'm holding those hooves a long time messing around and he's been standing.  I can tell he's lonely, so I think I'm going to go back to frequent tying and grooming because he enjoys the attention.  He wants to play with me like a horse bless his heart.  When the ground gets dry I'll go back to trying lunging/bridling & ground driving given the weather's not to distracting, he enjoys working with you.


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#29 JacqueB

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Posted 21 January 2014 - 05:59 PM

Well it's snowing today, but so lightly that nothing's sticking yet.  Still working with the colt who's almost 19 months now.  The farrier came today & he was really quite good tied to the post  So my fairly regular tying with grooming & hoof picking is working.  Also I'll tie him and leave him for an hour or so.  Consequently when the farrier left him tied today to go get something, the colt's head was in a quiet resting position standing, no chewing on the tie, no moving around.  Keeping the gregarious gelding in with him seems to be working great.  The gelding is a very warm & engaging fellow, but quite strict with the colt, too, since he was cut late himself - perfect.

I've decided not to try to market this colt til his 3rd year, so you'll get to follow this guy all thru his under saddle training which will be next fall!


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#30 JacqueB

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Posted 27 January 2014 - 01:32 PM

Next weekend it gets above freezing during the day.  I think I should put it out there that I'm going to work with the colt.  Bridling again, lunging etc. maybe 3-4 days in a row, that's how long they are projecting above freezing days, something to shoot for.


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#31 JacqueB

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Posted 27 February 2014 - 04:43 PM

Oh my goodness, it's been almost a month since I posted.  What can I say winter, plenty of snow, zero temps, taxes, retirement planning, family visiting, the list goes on & on.  Meanwhile, the colt's being an awfully good boy, learning to be patient, relaxed in everyday activities not involving a halter but moving him in & out of a stall for feeding or placing hay in the field. 

It's 20 mph winds & 12 tonight, so I tied him, groomed him, picked his feet and put his blanket on today & all went quietly well.  His feet are round, wearing evenly, the tendons & hocks are staying dry, he'll be twenty months soon, so we're past physitis fears and OCD isn't likely at this stage if we continue to be careful.  It's good to see him romping and trying to get the gelding playing with him although he tries to play with me & follows me around even more than the gelding. 

I'm hoping that March will bring some above freezing weather at the same time I've got some responsibilities behind me and he & I can have some learning times together.  I think I'm going to have to purchase some shipping boots that cover those knees for his trailer ride to Amethyst Acres when I do round pen work.

Don't give up on us.


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#32 JacqueB

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Posted 19 April 2014 - 05:48 PM

Well since it snowed about every week of March besides a variety of other stuff, youngster got tied several times & groomed but that was about it.  Now I've got him down near the round pen for this last week & it's a situation where I halter him for 4 times for his twice a day feeding + tying him to the post in the morning with grooming, & hoof picking.  That's been going on for a week.  As if we didn't know, consistency in handling makes a horse & handler's life so much easier and relaxed.  He really has not tried to be disobedient with doing his feet, just encouraging him to be a good boy is doing the job when he's not standing perfectly still for hoof picking & hoof moisturizer application.  He really even seems to be enjoying the attention & good about having his nose & nasal openings manipulated and his ears messed with & face brushed.  So I think tomorrow I'll start putting the bit back in his mouth, probably have to use his Mom's bridle - he's 15 hands now, although still very immature looking except his joints are big.  I'll enjoy tacking him up, too.  We'll probably have to take several walks to the round pen maybe with another person having a horse along to get him comfortable kind of off by himself.  But I'm sure as the weeks go by he'll get used to it and relaxed.  I plan to take my time walking close to him in the round pen & then slowly keeping space til we can use the whole round pen for lounging.  We'll be walking for a long time.  He's 22 months now, so I should probably change the title of the topic!  I'm still enjoying his willing attitude & want to keep that.  Keep him relaxed - I like Linda Tellington Jones work on the maze.  That would be a good thing to set up & have him do, it's slow & exacting requiring your patience & theirs.  Yeah that will be fun.


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#33 JacqueB

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Posted 21 April 2014 - 01:31 AM

Putting his bridle and bit back on was a pretty much a piece of cake.  Try to put his a surcingle on tomorrow.  Really standing still for doing his feet.  Moved one time with one hoof & I think he was just looking at something & readjusting so he could see better.


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#34 JacqueB

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Posted 21 April 2014 - 06:06 PM

What fun.  I really worked on getting him soo relaxed putting the bridle on & that was very nice. Then I put his halter on over the bridle & tied him to the post & introduced him to the surcingle, he had no reaction to it sliding up & down from poll to tail and neither did he move when I tightened the girth which surprised me.  I did put very long side reins on which he never was animated enough to run into their restriction.  And I just asked him to walk forward which required the reinforcement of a soft landing of the end of the lead rope on his butt. And it was within a minute that he was walking forward in a circle not stopping til I said hoe and he needed some extra attention to get the "hoe".  We did that twice in each direction within the stall and we were done - he was great!  He's dropping his head very nicely to take the bridle off.  Everything is sweet....so far


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#35 JacqueB

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Posted 23 April 2014 - 12:15 AM

no work today - stormy day plus a dear 35 year old retiree decided it was a good day to go to the beyond and that put different horses next to the colt during feeding.  Too many things going on for teaching today.


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#36 JacqueB

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Posted 24 April 2014 - 08:04 PM

Well yesterday was a lesson in being tied with the farriers busy in his adjacent aisle shoeing 3 horses and trimming another.  He did have company but he was ancy and pawing.  I kept him there a pretty long time till he was quietly standing with his head down & relaxed.  Today I figured he needed more standing tied activities, but this time I left him tied as I exited all the morning feeders and then he was alone while I did some other stuff.  So he was in the stall by himself with all the other horses out in the adjacent field which he may or may not be able to see.  Although, his pasture buddy was calling to him plenty.  When I came back he wasn't quiet with his head resting, but neither was he upset, so I went ahead & groomed him did his feet.  The colt yesterday was cooperative so that the farrier could use his hoof stand in front of the hind legs and behind.  Putting on the bridle wasn't as relaxed as I was hoping, but I think I was contributing to the problem, he wasn't defiant or reactive he just didn't drop his head in a relaxed manner.  The surcingle was again a non-event and he got more practiced at walking on verbal command & hoeing.  We finished that part quickly & he was great walking out as usual.  I think he & I are getting good enough that we can leave the stall & use the small enclosure and then I've got some help this weekend we'll try out the round pen.


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#37 JacqueB

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Posted 25 April 2014 - 04:08 PM

The weather is stormy today with intermittent showers.  The colt had his tying to the post lesson with nobody in the barn with him but being able to hear his pasture mate & if the other horses were in the right spots he would be able to see them, too.  Came back & we did the usual grooming and hoof picking/moisturizing procedure.  I got myself prepared for taking him out into the little enclose which opens out onto the 2 pastures.  But when I put the surcingle on him with the side reins already clipped & ready to go, he noticed the difference and did some movement. So I continued to go from poll to tail back & forth with the surcingle til there was no reaction.  Then when I was tightening his girth, he moved alittle.  So all that told me was we were not doing something new with his frame of mind.  I took the nose piece off the bridle & it was much more straight forward getting the bridle on, easy.  So when I asked him to walk he was right on it & was excellent about keeping going in a circle without any encouragement.  It was the "hoe" that we had to work on.  What worked every time for the hoe was saying "And hoe" with my voice coming down lower on the hoe.  We probably weren't 5 minutes and we were done.  He was stretching out during his walk, head lowered and nice and forward.  Quite good.  Staying with the known was a good thing today.


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#38 JacqueB

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Posted 26 April 2014 - 07:04 PM

Today my husband was power washing his tractor which is a barn wall away from the colt's stall.  So I tied him despite the racket and turned everyone out as usual and left tied for awhile.  He was glad to see me when I got back without signs of stress.  I groomed him and by the time I got to his last hoof to pick, he was so quiet and relaxed I just turned him out, saying to myself 'Three days in a row was good".  So we'll start back tomorrow when the wind isn't 15 mph.  Maybe try the small enclosure instead of just the stall for lunging.


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#39 talus

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Posted 26 April 2014 - 07:38 PM

I am enjoying your little blog on the training progress reports.  I am pretty much doing the same thing with a seven year old who severely foundered 2 years ago.  She has had a 2 year recovery and I am starting over again at square one with her.



#40 JacqueB

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Posted 27 April 2014 - 03:25 PM

Well, I think, Talus, with all your interest/experience in driving you should come down here and mentor me thru this!


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