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Lets Talk About Hind Ends.


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#61 diane

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Posted 26 October 2013 - 11:11 PM

I am really enjoying reading the posts on this discussion.  Could any of you recommend some good books or other sources of information that I could learn even more from regarding conformation and such?

I like Deb Bennett's work.  Through analysis she shows and explains using photos and drawings along with using photoshop to show and explain differences per individuals.  Many authors are now referencing her work.

 

Bennett wrote a series for Equus magazine.  This has been really informative.  The complete series started October 2009. 

 

Equus Vol 390 - March 2010 - The coupling

Equus Vol 404 - May 2011- The hinquarter in perspective

Equus Vol 405 - June 2011 - Developing an eye for the total hind limb

Equus Vol 406 - July 2011 - The shocking truth about sickle hocks

Equus Vol 407 - August 2011 - What's behind that stance

Equus Vol 410 - November 2011 - The spiral hind limb

Equus Vol 411 - December 2011 - 8 common hock problems

Equus Vol 412 - January 2012 - Hocks: you be the judge

 

Subsequent segments in the series analyse the shoulder/front end and then huge detail into the hoof.  Prior segments are about the body in general including the neck and head.

 

Bennett wrote her first Equus series in the 1980s and she put those segments into a series of 3 volumes (small paperbacks; 1988).  I read this series in 1994 and it explained and helped me understand the non-standardisation attributes I was seeing / feeling in not only my own but other's horses!  This was at a time I was tempted to take the judges' exam; Bennett's work was recommended reading material.  The recent Equus series is the latest of her work and subsequent knowledge.  It will be interesting to see if this work gets published as a separate book(s).  She also has a DVD set on conformation which is also worthwhile. 

 

:D yes, Bennett can be a provocatrix!


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cheers, diane
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#62 DKZ

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Posted 27 October 2013 - 12:27 AM

I like Deb Bennett's work.  Through analysis she shows and explains using photos and drawings along with using photoshop to show and explain differences per individuals.  Many authors are now referencing her work.

 

Bennett wrote a series for Equus magazine.  This has been really informative.  The complete series started October 2009. 

 

Equus Vol 390 - March 2010 - The coupling

Equus Vol 404 - May 2011- The hinquarter in perspective

Equus Vol 405 - June 2011 - Developing an eye for the total hind limb

Equus Vol 406 - July 2011 - The shocking truth about sickle hocks

Equus Vol 407 - August 2011 - What's behind that stance

Equus Vol 410 - November 2011 - The spiral hind limb

Equus Vol 411 - December 2011 - 8 common hock problems

Equus Vol 412 - January 2012 - Hocks: you be the judge

 

Subsequent segments in the series analyse the shoulder/front end and then huge detail into the hoof.  Prior segments are about the body in general including the neck and head.

 

Bennett wrote her first Equus series in the 1980s and she put those segments into a series of 3 volumes (small paperbacks; 1988).  I read this series in 1994 and it explained and helped me understand the non-standardisation attributes I was seeing / feeling in not only my own but other's horses!  This was at a time I was tempted to take the judges' exam; Bennett's work was recommended reading material.  The recent Equus series is the latest of her work and subsequent knowledge.  It will be interesting to see if this work gets published as a separate book(s).  She also has a DVD set on conformation which is also worthwhile. 

 

:D yes, Bennett can be a provocatrix!

 

 

I agree with Diane, Bennet can be very helpful.  I also have her books and the DVD set.  I don't agree with D. Bennet all the time, but then I don't agree with John Shelle 100% either, so what do I know? ;)


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#63 hansi

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Posted 27 October 2013 - 12:39 PM

I like Deb Bennett's work.  Through analysis she shows and explains using photos and drawings along with using photoshop to show and explain differences per individuals.  Many authors are now referencing her work.

 

Bennett wrote a series for Equus magazine.  This has been really informative.  The complete series started October 2009. 

 

Equus Vol 390 - March 2010 - The coupling

Equus Vol 404 - May 2011- The hinquarter in perspective

Equus Vol 405 - June 2011 - Developing an eye for the total hind limb

Equus Vol 406 - July 2011 - The shocking truth about sickle hocks

Equus Vol 407 - August 2011 - What's behind that stance

Equus Vol 410 - November 2011 - The spiral hind limb

Equus Vol 411 - December 2011 - 8 common hock problems

Equus Vol 412 - January 2012 - Hocks: you be the judge

 

Subsequent segments in the series analyse the shoulder/front end and then huge detail into the hoof.  Prior segments are about the body in general including the neck and head.

 

Bennett wrote her first Equus series in the 1980s and she put those segments into a series of 3 volumes (small paperbacks; 1988).  I read this series in 1994 and it explained and helped me understand the non-standardisation attributes I was seeing / feeling in not only my own but other's horses!  This was at a time I was tempted to take the judges' exam; Bennett's work was recommended reading material.  The recent Equus series is the latest of her work and subsequent knowledge.  It will be interesting to see if this work gets published as a separate book(s).  She also has a DVD set on conformation which is also worthwhile. 

 

:D yes, Bennett can be a provocatrix!

 

Diane dont you think that many recorded/published books with data are based on personal exprience? For instance when I see a line consistently winning in stress performance, I check further to ascertain why.

Books written by non-riders always make me take a grain of salt.

 

Do you have photos of AK Shah Munifeh, Serenity Osiris (young halter champion) Comparisons are shown well.

 

Hansi


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#64 diane

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Posted 27 October 2013 - 09:35 PM

Diane dont you think that many recorded/published books with data are based on personal exprience? For instance when I see a line consistently winning in stress performance, I check further to ascertain why.

Books written by non-riders always make me take a grain of salt.

 

Do you have photos of AK Shah Munifeh, Serenity Osiris (young halter champion) Comparisons are shown well.

 

Hansi

This particular author has reviewed an number of individuals of various breeds - physically (face to face), via photo and, as a paleotologist, via their skeletons.  She's done the study (PhD) and has been in the field for a good number of years.  She is also a rider.  Qualified ~ I think so.  Though some aspects, not a lot mind you, I don't agree with!

 

Yes, everyone has experience, hopefully, data - relevant data without generalisations is really useful.

 

Photos of AK Shah Munifeh, Serenity Osiris - not off hand :mellow:


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#65 Ray

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Posted 28 October 2013 - 03:13 AM

Here are the photos I have of AK Shah Munifeh:

Attached File  AK-Shah_Munifeh3.jpg   34.23KB   0 downloads

 

and Serenity Osiris: 

Attached File  S_Osiris.jpg   148.08KB   0 downloads

 

 



#66 VanAlma

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Posted 29 October 2013 - 12:22 PM

Here's a family full of butts I like. Treff-Haven Salma (sorry don't have good side shots) and her 2 daughters, Van Alma Zakhirah (tied) and Van Alma Penelope (with mom)

Salma is so strong through her back and loin that I never get tired of seeing her go. She's all business. Her daughters have her same rear end with a bit more stretch in the front in motion. 

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#67 VanAlma

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Posted 29 October 2013 - 12:28 PM

Here's my gelding, Bubba. (ETA - bad side shot of him) He can sit at the canter really well, but, when working under saddle, lacks in the strong trot and explosive power department. He can do an extended trot well on the trails, but that is without collection through the front end. If I try to limit him in the front, his back dies down, so to speak. I like his butt. It's his connection up top that can be limiting, I think. I have to do lots of strength building with him. He's improved greatly, but will never be, what I consider, a strong horse. He's a totally different mover than Salma, more lofty and supple.

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#68 Loriwoo

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Posted 30 October 2013 - 07:06 PM

rather a horse is standing or moving makes a huge difference.

I have found during my shopping to be told a horse is more of a Halter horse or a performance horse.

Silly me,

I want both and so have still not found anything!  

(sometimes the sellers don't know who they are talking to, even though the may know WHAT they are talking about, they prefer to try to fog up the picture)

I have seen some super nice horses on this thread, and I do agree some of the horses in photos that seemed to show hindends lacking in form, seem to need some groceries.



#69 Marilee

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Posted 23 February 2016 - 10:49 PM

bump for current interest in researching this further




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