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Juvenile Idiopathic Epilepsy Study Seeking Samples From Arabian Horses


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#1 phanilah

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Posted 17 February 2015 - 07:01 PM

The Brooks Equine Genetics Lab at the University of Florida (Gainesville) is working to identify the genetic cause of Juvenile Idiopathic Epilepsy (JIE) in the Arabian Horse. The project, led by Dr. Samantha Brooks, is funded in part by the Arabian Horse Foundation. The study seeks to identify the mode of inheritance, identify the mutation(s) associated with JIE, and ultimately develop a diagnostic test to assist owners and breeders in identifying carrier breeding stock.

To advance this research project, assistance from the Arabian horse community is requested. DNA samples are needed from horses that have been previously diagnosed with JIE, as well as horses that have had an offspring with JIE. All studies are confidential, so participant and horse identity will not be released.

"This project is an expansion of the Arabian Horse Foundation's support of research into genetic disorders of particular interest to the Arabian horse breed," stated Beth Minnich, who chairs the Foundation's Research Advisory Panel. Minnich continues, "while JIE is thought to be a genetic disorder, no extensive work has been done to identify the exact genetic mode of inheritance or the proposed relationship with Lavender Foal Syndrome."

JIE is a seizure disorder where a foal usually exhibits clinical signs between 2 days and 6 months of age. The seizures exhibited by foals with JIE generally begin with muscle stiffness all over the body and the foal might fall over. After the stiffening ceases, rapid muscle contractions then begin all over the body. The seizures can last from only a few seconds up to about 5 minutes. During this time the horse may lose consciousness, and could possibly injure itself while either falling over or thrashing on the ground. Once the episode has ended the foal usually exhibits some temporary post-seizure signs including blindness, lethargic behavior, and disorientation. Once the horse has outgrown the seizures it can usually go on to live a normal healthy life. Anti-seizure medications have been effective in reducing frequency and severity of the seizures and are helpful in decreasing risk of injury during an episode.

Please contact the Brooks Equine Genetics Lab for more information on participating in this study:
Phone: (352) 273-8080
Email: equinegenetics@ifas.ufl.edu

For additional information on the Arabian Horse Foundation's Research Program please contact:
Beth Minnich, Research Advisory Chair - phanilah@aol.com

The Arabian Horse Foundation is the official charity of the Arabian Horse Association and funds research on genetic and other diseases that affect the Arabian horse.  Additionally, it has a scholarship and educational program.  http://www.thearabia...n.org/home.html


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#2 phanilah

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Posted 22 September 2015 - 06:44 PM

I want to thank everyone who has shown an interest in this project and give an exciting update.

 

This project is entering into a validation phase, as the Brooks’ group has identified a candidate genetic marker that requires further investigation. So, additional samples are needed to help move this phase of the project along. This is what is needed:

1) hair samples from horses who have been diagnosed with JIE (either active cases or in the past) and

2) hair samples from unaffected relatives of these horses to serve as controls.

 

Please contact the Brooks Equine Genetics Lab for more information on participating in this study: Phone: (352) 273-8080, Email: equinegenetics@ifas.ufl.edu

 

Thanks -

 

Beth


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#3 zeplinsmom

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Posted 03 October 2015 - 05:55 AM

This is valuable research, and I'm glad it is being pursued. I have a colt whose sire was a maternal brother to an affected mare. The sire was unaffected. The mare was exported to Israel (with full disclosure of her condition) and unfortunately passed away not long after (unrelated).


Introducing OSIRION (Omar Saalim x Mysteekh), 2011 grey stallion prospect

NUHA STAR BENNU (Sabbataz JA x Starlite Duchess), 2013 grey Egyptian-sired colt

STARLITE DUCHESS (Bahim of Century x Jemima of Century), 1998 black Egyptian-related mare

MSU DREAMS ASWIRL AM (AM Clem Dreamon x AM Swirling Star) 2009 grey mare IFT Trueblue Goldmine+++// for 2014

ZEPLIN (CR Royale Sands x CR Lady Lilac), 2006 chestnut tobiano gelding

 


#4 phanilah

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Posted 14 December 2015 - 08:13 PM

Okay everyone - I'm shaking the bushes, so to speak, to help get samples submitted for this project....since work has entered into a validation phase, as many samples as possible for JIE affected horses are needed and the samples don't have to come only from the US. This is what is needed: 1) hair samples from horses who have been diagnosed with JIE (either active cases or in the past) and 2) (when possible) hair samples from unaffected relatives of these horses to serve as controls. Please contact the Brooks Equine Genetics Lab for more information on participating in this study: Phone: (352) 273-8080, Email: equinegenetics@ifas.ufl.edu

 

ALSO PLEASE PASS THE WORD ALONG TO ANYONE YOU KNOW YOU HAS HORSES OF INTEREST FOR THIS PROJECT!  ALL SAMPLE SUBMISSIONS ARE CONFIDENTIAL!

 

Thanks -

 

Beth


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